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YTM: The common abbreviation for yield to maturity, which is the annual rate of return on a financial asset that is held until maturity. Yield to maturity depends on both the coupon rate and the face or par value paid at maturity. If the selling price of a financial asset is equal to its par value, then the yield to maturity is equal to the current yield and the coupon rate. However, if the asset is selling at a discount, then the yield to maturity exceeds the current yield, which is greater than the coupon rate. And if the asset is selling at a premium, then the yield to maturity is less than the current yield, which is below than the coupon rate.

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COMPLEMENT: Two goods that "go together," either in consumption or production. In terms of demand, a complement-in-consumption is one of two goods that are consumed together such that an increase in the price of one good leads to a decrease in demand and a leftward shift in the demand curve for the other good. If the demand of good 1 decreases as the price of good 2 increases, the goods are complements-in-consumption. In terms of supply, a complement-in-production is one of two goods that are produced jointly using the same resources, such that an increase in the price of one good leads to an increase in supply and a rightward shift in the supply curve for the other good. If the supply of good 1 increases as the price of good 2 increases, the goods are complements-in-production.

     See also | demand | complement-in-consumption | supply | complement-in-production | demand curve | supply curve | consumption | production | demand shock | supply shock | demand determinants | supply determinants |


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ALLOCATION EFFECT

A change in the allocation of resources caused by placing taxes on economic activity. By creating disincentives to produce, consume, or exchange, taxes generally alter resource allocations. The allocation effect is typically used when governments seek to discourage the production, consumption, or exchange of particular goods or activities that are deemed undesirable (such as tobacco use or pollution). This is one of two effects of taxation. The other (primary) is the revenue effect, which is the generation of revenue used to finance government operations.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a dollar discount store seeking to buy either a T-shirt commemorating the first day of winter or software that won't crash your computer. Be on the lookout for fairy dust that tastes like salt.
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