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April 26, 2018 

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HOMOGENEOUS OF DEGREE N: A property of an equation the exists if independent variables are increased by a constant value, then the dependent variable is increased by the value raised to the power of n. The value of n can be greater than, less than, or equal to one. This property often surfaces in the analysis of production functions. If n = 1, then a doubling independent variables results in a doubling of the dependent variable and the production function has constant returns to scale. If n > 1, then a doubling independent variables results in more than a doubling of the dependent variable and the production function has increasing returns to scale. If n < 1, then a doubling independent variables results in less than a doubling of the dependent variable and the production function has decreasing returns to scale.

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CONTRIBUTIVE STANDARD: One of three basic income distribution standards (the other two are equality standard and needs standard). The contributive standard distributes income based on a person's contribution to production. This standard answers the For Whom? question of allocation primarily through the use of prices and markets. The resources used to produce goods that more highly valued society (meaning they better satisfy unlimited wants and needs) command higher prices and thus generate more income to their owners. An actor, for example, who can attract millions of adoring. $7-a-ticket fans to one performance of an action-packed, blockbuster movie produces a good that is more highly valued by society than a philosophy professor who spends all semester teaching a handful of reluctant, $100-a-credit-hour students the finer details of existentialism.

     See also | income distribution | income | distribution standards | needs standard | equality standard | three questions of allocation | efficiency | incentive | value | marginal productivity theory | For Whom? |


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CONTRIBUTIVE STANDARD, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: April 26, 2018].


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ALLOCATION EFFECT

A change in the allocation of resources caused by placing taxes on economic activity. By creating disincentives to produce, consume, or exchange, taxes generally alter resource allocations. The allocation effect is typically used when governments seek to discourage the production, consumption, or exchange of particular goods or activities that are deemed undesirable (such as tobacco use or pollution). This is one of two effects of taxation. The other (primary) is the revenue effect, which is the generation of revenue used to finance government operations.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store trying to buy either a rim for your spare tire or decorative celebrity figurines. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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Lombard Street is London's equivalent of New York's Wall Street.
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