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November 19, 2019 

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FIXED FACTOR OF PRODUCTION: An input whose quantity cannot be changed in the time period under consideration. This usually goes by the shorter term fixed input and should be immediately compared and contrasted with variable factor of production, which goes by the shorter term variable input. The most common example of a fixed factor of production is capital. A fixed factor of production provides the "capacity" constraint for the short-run production of a firm. As larger quantities of a variable factor of production, like labor, are added to a fixed factor of production like capital, the variable input becomes less productive. This is, by the way, the law of diminishing marginal returns. For more detailed discussion, take a look at the shorter, more commonly used alias of fixed factor of production, which is fixed input.

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EURO: The denomination of the so-called single currency that is designed to integrate economic and monetary policies for the European Union. The euro will contain paper currency (banknotes) and metal coins and will replace the European Currency Unit that is presently used for commercial and financial transactions. While that plans are to introduce this single currency with paper and coins in 2002, no one knows for sure if the euro will completely replace national currencies (British pound, French franc, etc.) for transactions within each nation. The paper currency will come in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 500 euros and the metal coins will come in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 cents, as well as 1 euro and 2 euros.

     See also | European Union | Maastricht Treaty | currency | European Currency Unit | monetary policy | exchange rate | Economic and Monetary Union | Euro zone | European System of Central Banks |


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AVERAGE REVENUE CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average revenue received by a perfectly competitive firm for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. Because average revenue is essentially the price of a good, the average revenue curve is also the demand curve for a perfectly competitive firm's output.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market seeking to buy either a brown leather attache case or car battery jumper cables. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
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Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice in Wonderland, was the pseudonym of Charles Dodgson, an accomplished mathematician and economist.
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