March 23, 2018 

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PATERNALISM: A fundamental philosophical viewpoint that the private sector (households and businesses) needs to be watched over--like a parent--by the public sector (government). In other words, members of society need to be watched over, cared for, and kept out of trouble, like parents watch over, care for, and keep their children out of trouble. This philosophy of paternalism should be contrasted directly with the philosophy of laissez faire, which essentially says "Hey, we're all grown ups here, we can make our own decisions."

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FACTOR SUPPLY CURVE: A graphical representation of the relation between the price to a factor of production and quantity of the factor supplied, holding all ceteris paribus factor supply determinants constant. The factor supply curve is one half of the factor market. The other half is the factor demand curve. The factor supply curve indicates the quantity of a factor that would be supplied at alternative factor prices. While all factors of production, or scarce resources, including labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship, have factor supply curves, labor is the factor most often analyzed. Like other supply curves, the factor supply curve is generally positively sloped. Higher factor prices are associated with larger quantities supplied and lower factor prices go with smaller quantities supplied.

     See also | factor supply | curve | factor markets | factor price | factors of production | labor | capital | land | entrepreneurship | perfect competition | monopsony | perfectly elastic | marginal factor cost | average factor cost | market control |

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Net exports by the foreign sector that depend on income or production (especially national income and gross domestic product). That is, changes in income induce changes in net exports. Induced net exports reflect the induced relation between imports and income, which means net exports decline as income increases. They are measured by the negative of the marginal propensity to import (MPM) and are reflected by the negative slope of net exports line. The alternative to induced net exports is autonomous net exports, which do not depend on income.

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Junk bonds are so called because they have a better than 50% chance of default, carrying a Standard & Poor's rating of CC or lower.
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