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January 24, 2022 

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SCARCE RESOURCE: A resource with an available quantity less than its desired use. Scarce resources are also called factors of production. Scarce goods are also termed economic goods. Scarce resources are used to produce scarce goods. Like the more general society-wide condition of scarcity, a given resource is scarce because it has a limited availability in combination with a greater (potentially unlimited) productive use. It's both of these that make it scarce. In other words, even though an item is quite limited it will not be a scarce resource if it has few if any uses (think pocket lint and free good).

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FREE GOOD: A resource is free if it can produce all of the goods people want or need it to produce... and then some. Being free, however, doesn't mean a resource is not limited. Maybe it's free because people just can"t figure out what to do with it. Or if it is used for production, people don"t want all that's produced. For most of the time across most of this planet air is a free good. In other words, there is plenty of air to go around, plenty of air to satisfy all of the existing wants and needs. Does this mean that air is NOT valuable? Quite the contrary. Air is extremely valuable. It provides one of the most important inputs into human life. It's a free resource because there's enough to go around.

     See also | scarcity | opportunity cost | goods | services | wants | needs | satisfaction | scarce good | free resource | scarce resource |


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FREE GOOD, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: January 24, 2022].


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LONG-RUN MARGINAL COST

The change in the long-run total cost of producing a good or service resulting from a change in the quantity of output produced. Like all marginals, long-run marginal cost is an increment of the corresponding total. It is the change in long-run total cost divided by, or resulting from, a change in quantity. Long-run marginal cost is guided by returns to scale rather than marginal returns.

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