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MARKET SUPPLY: The total supply of every seller willing and able to sell a good. Market supply is found by combining the individual supplies of every firm or producer willing and able to sell a particular good. The market supply curve is found by horizontally adding all individual supply curves, that is, sum up the quantities supplied by all sellers at each and every price. Market supply operates according to the law of supply, as illustrated by a upward-sloping market supply curve. For higher prices the quantity supplied by all sellers in the market combined is greater than the quantity supplied for lower prices.

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GOVERNMENT SECURITY: A financial instrument used by the federal government to borrow money. Government securities are issued by the U.S. Treasury to cover the federal government's budget deficit. Much like consumers who borrow money from banks to finance the purchase of a house or car, the federal government borrows money to finance some of its expenditures. These securities include small denomination ($25, $50, or $100), nonnegotiable Series EE savings bonds purchased by consumers. The really serious money, however, is borrowed using larger denomination securities ($100,000 or more) purchased by banks, corporations, foreign governments, and others with large sums of money to lend.

     See also | government borrowing | government sector | budget deficit | Treasury bill | Treasury note | Treasury bond | government debt | open market operations | bank | corporation | money creation | risk |


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MARGINAL REVENUE CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between the marginal revenue received by a perfectly competitive firm for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. Because a perfectly competitive firm is a price taker and faces a horizontal demand curve, its marginal revenue curve is also horizontal and coincides with its average revenue (and demand) curve. A perfectly competitive firm maximizes profit by producing the quantity of output found at the intersection of the marginal revenue curve and marginal cost curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling through a department store wanting to buy either a wall poster commemorating next Thursday or a pair of gray heavy duty boot socks. Be on the lookout for deranged pelicans.
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Junk bonds are so called because they have a better than 50% chance of default, carrying a Standard & Poor's rating of CC or lower.
"We must be willing to let go of the life we have planned, so as to have the life that is waiting for us. "

-- E. M. Forster, writer

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