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January 16, 2018 

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IMPORTS LINE: A graphical depiction of the relation between imports bought from the foreign sector and the domestic economy's aggregate level of income or production. This relation is most important for deriving the net exports line, which plays a minor, but growing role in the study of Keynesian economics. An imports line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous imports, and slope, which is the marginal propensity to import and indicates induced imports. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking the net exports line, derived as the difference between the exports line and imports line, onto the consumption line, after adding investment expenditures and government purchases.

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INSIDE LAG: In the context of economic policies, the time between a shock to the economy and corrective government action responding to the shock. This is one of two primary lags in the use of economic policies. The other is outside lag, the time between the government action and the affect on the economy. The inside lag can be divided into the recognition lag and the implementation lag. The recognition lag is identifying the shock or need for action and the implementation is determining the appropriate policy response. Monetary policy tends to have a shorter outside lag than fiscal policy. The length of the inside and outside lags is one argument against the use of discretionary policies to stabilize business cycles.

     See also | economic policies | policy lags | outside lag | recognition lag | implementation lag | leading economic indicator | business cycle | monetary policy | fiscal policy |


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INTEREST-RATE EFFECT

A change in aggregate expenditures on real production, especially those made by the household and business sectors, that results because a change in the price level alters the interest rate which then affects the cost of borrowing. This is one of three effects underlying the negative slope of the aggregate demand curve associated with a movement along the aggregate demand curve and a change in aggregate expenditures. The other two are real-balance effect and net-export effect.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a dollar discount store trying to buy either a really, really exciting, action-filled video game or a coffee cup commemorating the moon landing. Be on the lookout for slow moving vehicles with darkened windows.
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