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October 19, 2018 

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BLACK MARKET: An illegal market in which the price of the goods sold is above a legally set maximum price. A black market invariable results whenever the government imposes a price ceiling on a good. A common example of a price ceiling is rent controls on apartments in many large cities. Although landlords cannot "legally" rent apartments for more than the specified maximum, they often do so "illegally" by charging "finders fees" and "tenant association dues." In so doing, they have entered into the realm of black markets.

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POLICY LAGS: A series of lags between the onset of an economic problem, such as business-cycle contraction, and the full impact of the policy designed to correct the problem, such as expansionary fiscal or monetary policy. Policy lags can take several years and are one of the key arguments against discretionary policies and for reliance on self correction and automatic stabilizers. Policy lags are often divided into inside lags, the time between the shock and the corrective policy, and outside lags, the time between the corrective policy and full impact on the economy.

     See also | economic policies | stabilization policies | inside lag | outside lag | recognition lag | implementation lag | self correction | discretionary policy | automatic stabilizers | business cycle | contraction |


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POLICY LAGS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: October 19, 2018].


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MARGINAL PROPENSITY TO SAVE

The proportion of each additional dollar of household income that is used for saving. The marginal propensity to save (abbreviated MPS) is another term for the slope of the saving line and is calculated as the change in saving divided by the change in income. The MPS plays a central role in Keynesian economics. It quantifies the saving-income relation, which is the flip side of the consumption-income relation, and thus it reflects the fundamental psychological law. It is also a critical to the multiplier process. A related saving measure is the average propensity to save.

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The first paper notes printed in the United States were in denominations of 1 cent, 5 cents, 25 cents, and 50 cents.
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