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WEIGHT: When applied to location theory, the relative attractive force of one activity to another based on transportation cost. The weight of an activity in this context is comparable to the weight of matter subject to gravitation forces. The weight of an activity is greater if it incurs higher transportation cost. As such, it is attracted, or pulled, to other activities to reduce transportation cost. With the weight (transportation cost) of an activity is often related to physical weight (heavier items cost more to move), it need not be. Other factors affecting weight include special handling (security, comfort) and type of transportation (walking, automobile, airplane).

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UNEMPLOYMENT SOURCES: The unemployment of resources in general, and labor in particular, can be attributable to four basic reasons, or sources: cyclical, seasonal, frictional, and structural. Cyclical unemployment is involuntary unemployment created by business cycle recessions. Seasonal unemployment is relatively regular, read this as predictable, unemployment tied to a particular job. Frictional unemployment is temporary unemployment created when workers switch jobs. Structural unemployment is relatively permanent unemployment created because workers' skills are not the same as the skills needed on the job.

     See also | unemployment | unemployment rate | cyclical unemployment | seasonal unemployment | frictional unemployment | structural unemployment | natural unemployment | unemployment problems |


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UNEMPLOYMENT SOURCES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2020. [Accessed: October 29, 2020].


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SAVING LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between household sector saving and income. The saving line is closely related to the consumption line that forms one of the key building blocks for Keynesian economics. A saving line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous saving, and slope, which is the marginal propensity to save and indicates induced saving. The injections-leakages model used in Keynesian economics is based on the saving line.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time touring the new suburban shopping complex seeking to buy either hand lotion, a big bottle of hand lotion or a lighted magnifying glass. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
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The wealthy industrialist, Andrew Carnegie, was once removed from a London tram because he lacked the money needed for the fare.
"He who truly knows has no occasion to shout. "

-- Leonardo da Vinci, painter, sculptor, architect, engineer

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