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DISCRETIONARY: A specific choice, act, or decision, often designed to achieve a particular goal. The term is commonly used in economics in reference to government policies, such as discretionary fiscal policy or discretionary monetary policy. In both examples, government undertakes explicit actions through changes in government spending, taxes, the money supply, or interest rates to stabilize the business cycle. Discretionary is also frequently used to modify income, spending, expenditures, or comparable terms to capture choices made over the use of income. Discretionary income, for example, is the amount of after-tax household income that can be used for either consumption spending or saving.

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UNEMPLOYMENT SOURCES: The unemployment of resources in general, and labor in particular, can be attributable to four basic reasons, or sources: cyclical, seasonal, frictional, and structural. Cyclical unemployment is involuntary unemployment created by business cycle recessions. Seasonal unemployment is relatively regular, read this as predictable, unemployment tied to a particular job. Frictional unemployment is temporary unemployment created when workers switch jobs. Structural unemployment is relatively permanent unemployment created because workers' skills are not the same as the skills needed on the job.

     See also | unemployment | unemployment rate | cyclical unemployment | seasonal unemployment | frictional unemployment | structural unemployment | natural unemployment | unemployment problems |


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UNEMPLOYMENT SOURCES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: January 26, 2022].


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MARGINAL REVENUE CURVE, PERFECT COMPETITION

A curve that graphically represents the relation between the marginal revenue received by a perfectly competitive firm for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. Because a perfectly competitive firm is a price taker and faces a horizontal demand curve, its marginal revenue curve is also horizontal and coincides with its average revenue (and demand) curve. A perfectly competitive firm maximizes profit by producing the quantity of output found at the intersection of the marginal revenue curve and marginal cost curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing about a thrift store looking to buy either a black duffle bag with velcro closures or any book written by Isaac Asimov. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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Junk bonds are so called because they have a better than 50% chance of default, carrying a Standard & Poor's rating of CC or lower.
"It has been my philosophy of life that difficulties vanish when faced boldly. "

-- Isaac Asimov

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