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YIELD: The rate of return on a financial asset. In some simple cases, the yield on a financial asset, like commercial paper, corporate bond, or government security, is the asset's interest rate. However, as a more general rule, the yield includes both the interest earned from an asset plus any changes in the asset's price. Suppose, for example, that a $100,000 bond has a 10 percent interest rate, such that the holder receives $10,000 interest per year. If the price of the bond increases over the course of the year from $100,000 to $105,000, then the bond's yield is greater than 10 percent. It includes the $10,000 interest plus the $5,000 bump in the price, giving a yield of 15 percent. Because bonds and similar financial assets often have fixed interest payments, their prices and subsequently yields move up and down as economic conditions change.

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CYCLICAL UNEMPLOYMENT: Unemployment attributable to a general decline in macroeconomic activity, especially expenditures on gross domestic product, that occurs during a business-cycle contraction. When the economy dips into a contraction, or recession, aggregate demand declines, so less output is produced and fewer workers and other resources are employed. Hence unemployment of the cyclical variety increases. Cyclical unemployment is one of four unemployment sources. The other three are seasonal unemployment, frictional unemployment, and structural unemployment.

     See also | unemployment | aggregate expenditures | gross domestic product | business cycle | contraction | recession | depression | aggregate demand | seasonal unemployment | frictional unemployment | structural unemployment | unemployment sources |


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CYCLICAL UNEMPLOYMENT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: January 16, 2019].


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST AND MARGINAL FACTOR COST

A mathematical connection between average factor cost and marginal factor cost stating that the change in the average factor cost depends on a comparison between average factor cost and marginal factor cost. For perfect competition, with no market control, marginal factor cost is equal to average factor cost, and average factor cost does not change. For monopsony and other firms with market control, marginal factor cost is greater than average factor cost, and average factor cost rises.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers hoping to buy either several orange mixing bowls or clothing for your pet dog. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
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Ragnar Frisch and Jan Tinbergen were the 1st Nobel Prize winners in Economics in 1969.
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