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December 12, 2018 

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INCENTIVE: A cost or benefit that motivates a decision or action by consumers, businesses, or other participants in the economy. Some incentives are explicitly created by government policies to achieve a desired end or they can just be part of the wacky world we call economics. The most noted incentive in the study of economics is that provided by prices. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the . When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation system that society uses to answer the three questions of allocation.

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UTILITY MAXIMIZATION: The process or goal of obtaining the highest level of utility from the consumption or use of goods and services. This is based on the seemingly obvious presumption that people prefer more to less, which is intimately tied to the unlimited wants and needs aspect of scarcity. In other words, because people have unlimited wants and needs, because they always have unfulfilled wants or needs, satisfying these wants and needs is a desirable thing to do.

     See also | utility | util | consumption | satisfaction | scarcity | unlimited wants and needs | budget constraint |


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UTILITY MAXIMIZATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: December 12, 2018].


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TOTAL FACTOR COST, MONOPSONY

The opportunity cost incurred by a monopsony when using a given factor of production to produce a good or service. This is the total cost associated with the use of a particular resource or factor of production--it is the total cost of the factor. For monopsony, the price paid increases with the quantity purchased and total factor cost increases at an increasing rate. Total factor cost is predominately used in the analysis of the factor market. Two derivative factor cost measures are average factor cost and marginal factor cost.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store wanting to buy either a pair of gray heavy duty boot socks or a 50-foot blue garden hose. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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