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SAVING FUNCTION: The positive relation between household saving and household disposable income. The saving function is commonly presented as the saving line or propensity-to-saving line. The slope of this line is the marginal propensity to save, which is the proportion of any additional income used for saving. The saving function and the marginal propensity to saving play key roles in the multiplier and accelerator concepts. Because consumption is the difference between disposable income and saving, the consumption function is a complementary relation to the saving function.

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INFLATIONARY GAP, KEYNESIAN MODEL: The difference between equilibrium aggregate production achieved in the Keynesian model and full-employment aggregate production that occurs when equilibrium aggregate production is greater than full-employment aggregate production. An inflationary gap, also termed an expansionary gap, is associated with a business-cycle expansion. The prescribed Keynesian remedy for an inflationary gap is contractionary fiscal policy. This is one of two alternative output gaps that can occur when equilibrium generates production that differs from full employment. The other is a recessionary gap.

     See also | inflationary gap | recessionary gap, Keynesian model | Keynesian model | Keynesian equilibrium | two-sector Keynesian model | three-sector Keynesian model | four-sector Keynesian model | Keynesian disequilibrium | injections-leakages model | multiplier | fiscal policy | contractionary fiscal policy | expansionary fiscal policy | Keynesian economics | Keynesian cross | aggregate expenditures | aggregate expenditures line | effective demand | induced expenditures | autonomous expenditures | macroeconomics | full employment | automatic stabilizers | injections | leakages | Keynesian cross and aggregate market | expenditures multiplier | accelerator principle | paradox of thrift | aggregate market analysis | business cycles |


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SAVING SCHEDULE

A table or chart that represents the relation between saving by the household sector and income. A saving schedule is commonly used for a basic, instructional presentation of aggregate saving activity by the household sector and is also used as a source of numbers for deriving the saving line. The key measures derived from the saving-income relation in the schedule are average propensity to save and marginal propensity to save. The consumption schedule is comparable, and more important, table for the relation between consumption and income.

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