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December 16, 2018 

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FED PYRAMID: A simple little diagram that depicts the structure of the Federal Reserve System, which is in the shape of triangle (hence the not totally accurate term "pyramid"), with a large base that comes to a peak. The base of the pyramid contains thousands of commercial banks, which rests on a foundation of the millions of people who make up the nonbank public. The middle of the pyramid includes 37 Federal Reserve Banks, including 12 District Banks and 25 Branch Banks. Resting at the top of the pyramid is the Board of Governors, with the Chairman at the very, very top. The top also has two notable offshoots -- the Federal Open Market Committee and the Federal Advisory Council.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: A Little Magic
  • Money
  • Banks
  • Money Creation
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Fred Returns
  • Review
  • Currency
  • Paper Loans
  • Money Creation
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Modern Banking
  • Fractional-Reserve Magic
  • Injection
  • Another Bank
  • Yet Another Bank
  • Total Creation
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: The Multiplier
  • The Concept
  • Reserve Ratio
  • Money Multiplier
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Policy
  • Control
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Money Creation

    The magic of money creation as practiced by private banks is the topic of this lesson. While it seems like magic, money creation is a fundamental aspect of fractional-reserve banking. As such, in this lesson we take a look at why and how banks create money (a task they would seem to be the exclusive privilege of government). This examination of money creation provides insight into how government is able to control the economy's money supply.

    • The first unit introduces the magic of money creation, as practiced by the banking system.
    • The second unit presents a hypothetical example of money creation as practiced by Fred the Goldsmith, where the money is different, but the process is comparable to modern banks.
    • The third unit of this lesson, then examines a detailed example of how the banking system goes about creating money when it has an injection of excess reserves.
    • In the fourth unit, the money creation process is summarized in terms of a deposit multiplier, which a thought or two on how this can be expanded to a money multiplier, which interests government as it seeks to control the money supply.
    • The last unit of this lesson examines the money creation process in the context of monetary policies and government control of the money supply.

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    BUYERS' PREFERENCES, DEMAND DETERMINANT

    The satisfaction that buyers receive from the purchase of a good, which is assumed constant when a demand curve is constructed. Buyers' preferences is one of five demand determinants that shift the demand curve when they change. The other four are buyers' income, other prices, buyers' expectations, and number of buyers.

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    APLS

    ORANGE REBELOON
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall hoping to buy either a lighted magnifying glass or a small, foam rubber football. Be on the lookout for high interest rates.
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    "If things are not going well with you, begin your effort at correcting the situation by carefully examining the service you are rendering, and especially the spirit in which you are rendering it."

    -- Roger Babson, statistician and columnist

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