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January 22, 2018 

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LABOR-LEISURE TRADEOFF: The perpetual tradeoff faced by human beings between the amount of time spent engaged in wage-paying productive work and satisfaction-generating leisure activities. The key to this tradeoff is a comparison between the wage received from working and the amount of satisfaction generated from leisure. Such a comparison generally means that a higher wage entices people to spend more time working, which entails a positively sloped labor supply curve. However, the backward-bending labor supply curve results when a higher wage actually entices people to work less and to "consume" more leisure time.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Adjustments
  • Overview
  • Three Questions
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Determinants
  • Shifts
  • Demand
  • Supply
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Single Shifts
  • More Demand
  • Less Demand
  • More Supply
  • Less Supply
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Double Shifts
  • More Demand and More Supply
  • More Demand and Less Supply
  • Less Demand and Less Supply
  • Less Demand and More Supply
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Cause and Effect
  • Economic Science
  • Link Sequence
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Market Shocks

    Our goal in this lesson is to investigate disruptions of the market. Specifically, we want to use the market model previously developed, to examine the why and how of market shocks. What causes market shocks? How to markets react when shocked? These are just a few of the questions we want to consider. If the truth be known, markets in the real world don't remain at the same locations for very long. They move. They adjust. Prices change. Quantities change. We can understand these real world market changes, by analyzing what happens to market model when it's shocked.

    • The first unit of this lesson lays the foundation of analyzing market shorts with an overview of the adjustment process and the particular role played by the ceteris paribus assumption.
    • In the second unit, we review the five determinants of demand and five determinants of supply, because these are the are what cause market disruptions.
    • We then move into the actual adjustment process in the third unit, examining the four basic disruptions involving a shift in either the demand or supply curve.
    • The fourth unit builds on these four basic shifts to exam four complex shifts that have simultaneous shifts in both the demand and supply curves.
    • We end this lesson in the fifth unit by relating these market shocks to the fundamental notion of cause and effect inherent in the study of economic science.

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    RATIONAL ABSTENTION

    The decision NOT to do something (such as vote in an election) because the cost of taking the action is more than the expected benefit. The rational decision to refrain from an endeavor is a straightforward application of utility maximization and along with the related notion of rational ignorance, is a source of voter apathy and government inefficiency.

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    APLS

    GRAY SKITTERY
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area hoping to buy either a rechargeable battery for your camera or a coffee cup commemorating the first day of spring. Be on the lookout for poorly written technical manuals.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    In his older years, Andrew Carnegie seldom carried money because he was offended by its sight and touch.
    "Now is the only time there is. Make your now wow, your minutes miracles, and your days pay. Your life will have been magnificently lived and invested, and when you die you will have made a difference."

    -- Mark Victor Hansen

    LCH
    Life Cycle Hypothesis
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
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