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February 6, 2016 

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ADJUSTMENT, SHORT-RUN AGGREGATE MARKET: Disequilibrium in the short-run aggregate market induces changes in the price level that restore equilibrium. If the price level is above the short-run equilibrium price level, economy-wide product market surpluses cause the price level to fall. If the price level is below the short-run equilibrium price level, economy-wide product market shortages cause the price level to rise. In both cases short-run equilibrium is restored. You might want to compare adjustment, long-run aggregate market. Price level changes induce changes in both aggregate expenditures and real production. Unlike the long-run aggregate market, changes in the price level can induce changes in short-run aggregate supply, making it greater or less than full-employment real production.

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TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS: The notion that people relocate from one political jurisdiction to another in search of a more preferred package of government taxes and spending. This hypothesis suggests that people "shop" for compatible government activity in the same way they might shop for a car, a house, or a flavor of ice cream. The Tiebout hypothesis indicates that people have two methods of "voting" on government activity -- one is at the ballot box the other is with their feet by seeking a more preferred location.

     See also | public choice | logrolling | explicit logrolling | majority rule | super majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | principal-agent problem | principle of the median voter | term limits | line item veto | sunset law |


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TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: February 6, 2016].


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BALANCE OF TRADE DEFICIT

The negative difference of the value of goods and services exported out of a country less the value of goods and services imported into the country. A balance of trade deficit is the official term for negative net exports that occurs when imports exceed exports. A balance of trade deficit is also termed an "unfavorable" balance of trade because it results in a net outflow of monetary payments from the domestic economic to the foreign sector, which tends to be bad for a country. The alternative is a balance of trade surplus in which exports exceed imports.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

U 6 Unemployment
November 2015
9.9% Up a little
Includes those who have given up looking. BLS

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a crowded estate auction looking to buy either several magazines on computer software or a T-shirt commemorating the second moon landing. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
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