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July 29, 2016 

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THRIFT INSTITUTIONS: Non-profit depository financial institutions that were originally established to provide limited banking services, often to specific groups, that were not adequately offered by traditional banks. The three primary thrift institutions are credit unions, savings and loan associations, and mutual savings banks. In recent decades these thrift institutions have broaden the range of financial services, especially offering checkable deposits, and thus operate as banks. In particular, that come under the same monetary policy regulation as traditional banks.

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TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS: The notion that people relocate from one political jurisdiction to another in search of a more preferred package of government taxes and spending. This hypothesis suggests that people "shop" for compatible government activity in the same way they might shop for a car, a house, or a flavor of ice cream. The Tiebout hypothesis indicates that people have two methods of "voting" on government activity -- one is at the ballot box the other is with their feet by seeking a more preferred location.

     See also | public choice | logrolling | explicit logrolling | majority rule | super majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | principal-agent problem | principle of the median voter | term limits | line item veto | sunset law |


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TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: July 29, 2016].


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IMPLICIT COLLUSION

Seemingly independent, but parallel, actions among competing firms (mostly oligopolistic firms) in an industry designed to control the market, raise the price, and otherwise act like a monopoly. Also termed tacit collusion, the distinguishing feature of implicit collusion is the lack of any explicit agreement. This is one of two types of collusion. The other is explicit or overt collusion, which involves an explicit agreement.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

New Orders for Manufactured Durable Goods
November 2015
$238.8 billion U.S. Commerce Dept.
Up 0.1% from Oct. 2015

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BROWN PRAGMATOX
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching the newspaper want ads hoping to buy either any book written by Stephan King or a T-shirt commemorating next Thursday. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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Potato chips were invented in 1853 by a irritated chef repeatedly seeking to appease the hard to please Cornelius Vanderbilt who demanded french fried potatoes that were thinner and crisper than normal.
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