Google
Friday 
May 29, 2015 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
Today's Index
Yesterday's Index
303.6

Help us compile the AmosWEB Free Lunch Index. Tell us about your last lunch.

Skipped lunch altogether.
Bought by another.
Ate lunch at home.
Brought lunch from home.
Fast food drive through.
Fast food dine in.
All-you-can eat buffet.
Casual dining with tip.
Fancy upscale with tip.

More About the Index


THREE-SECTOR INJECTIONS-LEAKAGES MODEL: A model used to identify equilibrium in Keynesian economics based on injections (investment and government purchases) and leakages (saving and taxes) for the three domestic sectors (household, business, and government). Equilibrium is achieved at the intersection of the saving and tax line, S + T, and the investment and government purchases line, I + G.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number)Worth a Look
Visit the WEB*pedia

TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS: The notion that people relocate from one political jurisdiction to another in search of a more preferred package of government taxes and spending. This hypothesis suggests that people "shop" for compatible government activity in the same way they might shop for a car, a house, or a flavor of ice cream. The Tiebout hypothesis indicates that people have two methods of "voting" on government activity -- one is at the ballot box the other is with their feet by seeking a more preferred location.

     See also | public choice | logrolling | explicit logrolling | majority rule | super majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | principal-agent problem | principle of the median voter | term limits | line item veto | sunset law |


Recommended Citation:

TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2015. [Accessed: May 29, 2015].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: Tiebout hypothesis

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

MARGINAL REVENUE, MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION

The change in total revenue resulting from a change in the quantity of output sold. Marginal revenue indicates how much extra revenue a monopolistically competitive firm receives for selling an extra unit of output. It is found by dividing the change in total revenue by the change in the quantity of output. Marginal revenue is the slope of the total revenue curve and is one of two revenue concepts derived from total revenue. The other is average revenue. To maximize profit, a monopolistically competitive firm equates marginal revenue and marginal cost.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Consumer Price Index Urban
January 2015
233.707
Down 0.7% from December 2014 Source: BLS

More Stats

WHITE GULLIBON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall looking to buy either storage boxes for your winter clothes or several magazines on time travel. Be on the lookout for small children selling products door-to-door.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Only 1% of the U.S. population paid income taxes when the income tax was established in 1914.
"The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them. "

-- Mark Twain

ADV
Ad Valorem
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2015 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster