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March 26, 2017 

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HIERARCHY OF NEEDS: Developed by Abraham Maslow, the notion that people are motivated to satisfy basic physiological needs (food, shelter, etc.) before moving on to satisfying higher psychological needs (security, companionship, etc.). These alternative needs are layered in a hierarchial pattern with physiological needs on the bottom, safety needs on the second layer, belonging needs on the third layer, esteem needs on the fourth layer, and self-actualization needs at the top. This hierarchy of needs has been used to help explain the progress of human societies from agrarian to manufacturing to service to information.

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TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS: The notion that people relocate from one political jurisdiction to another in search of a more preferred package of government taxes and spending. This hypothesis suggests that people "shop" for compatible government activity in the same way they might shop for a car, a house, or a flavor of ice cream. The Tiebout hypothesis indicates that people have two methods of "voting" on government activity -- one is at the ballot box the other is with their feet by seeking a more preferred location.

     See also | public choice | logrolling | explicit logrolling | majority rule | super majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | principal-agent problem | principle of the median voter | term limits | line item veto | sunset law |


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TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2017. [Accessed: March 26, 2017].


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AVERAGE VARIABLE COST

Total variable cost per unit of output, found by dividing total variable cost by the quantity of output. When compared with price (per unit revenue), average variable cost (AVC) indicates whether or not a profit-maximizing firm should shut down production in the short run. Average variable cost is one of three average cost concepts important to short-run production analysis. The other two are average total cost and average fixed cost. A related concept is marginal cost.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Consumer Price Index Urban
November 2016
241.353
Up 0.2% from Oct. 2016 Source: BLS

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching the newspaper want ads seeking to buy either a combination CD player, clock radio, and telephone (with answering machine) or a revolving spice rack. Be on the lookout for strangers with large satchels of used undergarments.
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