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November 27, 2014 

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OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY: The mobility, or movement, of factors of production from one type of productive activity to another type of productive activity. In particular, occupational mobility is the ease with which resources can change occupations. For example, a worker leaves a job as an accountant to takes a job as a computer programmer. Some factors are highly mobile and thus can easily moved jobs. Other factors are highly immobile and not easily able to switch production activities.

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TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS: The notion that people relocate from one political jurisdiction to another in search of a more preferred package of government taxes and spending. This hypothesis suggests that people "shop" for compatible government activity in the same way they might shop for a car, a house, or a flavor of ice cream. The Tiebout hypothesis indicates that people have two methods of "voting" on government activity -- one is at the ballot box the other is with their feet by seeking a more preferred location.

     See also | public choice | logrolling | explicit logrolling | majority rule | super majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | principal-agent problem | principle of the median voter | term limits | line item veto | sunset law |


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TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: November 27, 2014].


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POLITICAL BUSINESS CYCLES

The notion that business cycles are caused by elected government leaders who manipulate the economy to achieve personal political goals, that is, to be re-elected and remain in office. The leaders stimulate the economy leading up to an election, creating a business-cycle expansion that ensures (they hope) re-election, they then induce a business-cycle contraction after the election to correct problems created by the pre-election stimulation. This explanation suggests that government is the source of business cycles are should not be allowed to implement discretionary stabilization policies.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Sales of New Single-Family Homes
September 2014
467,000 (seasonal adjusted annual rate)
Up 0.2% from August 2014 Source: Econ Stats Adm.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time surfing the Internet wanting to buy either a wall poster commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki or decorative garden figurines. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
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Paper money used by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts prior to the U.S. Revolutionary War, which was issued against the dictates of Britain, was designed by patriot and silversmith, Paul Revere.
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