Google
Saturday 
December 3, 2016 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
Today's Index
Yesterday's Index
164.7

Help us compile the AmosWEB Free Lunch Index. Tell us about your last lunch.

Skipped lunch altogether.
Bought by another.
Ate lunch at home.
Brought lunch from home.
Fast food drive through.
Fast food dine in.
All-you-can eat buffet.
Casual dining with tip.
Fancy upscale with tip.

More About the Index
Something, something about finals?

Lack of sleep.
Roommate finishing early.
No more boring lectures.
Semester almost over.
Forgot you were taking a class.
That other thing.

KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS: A school of thought developed by John Maynard Keynes built on the proposition that aggregate demand is the primary source of business cycle instability, especially recessions. The basic structure of Keynesian economics was initially presented in Keynes' book The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, published in 1936. For the next forty years, the Keynesian school dominated the economics discipline and reached a pinnacle as a guide for federal government policy in the 1960s. It fell out of favor in the 1970s and 1980s, as monetarism, neoclassical economics, supply-side economics, and rational expectations became more widely accepted, but it still has a strong following in the academic and policy-making arenas.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number)Worth a Look Visit the WEB*pedia

TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS: The notion that people relocate from one political jurisdiction to another in search of a more preferred package of government taxes and spending. This hypothesis suggests that people "shop" for compatible government activity in the same way they might shop for a car, a house, or a flavor of ice cream. The Tiebout hypothesis indicates that people have two methods of "voting" on government activity -- one is at the ballot box the other is with their feet by seeking a more preferred location.

     See also | public choice | logrolling | explicit logrolling | majority rule | super majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | principal-agent problem | principle of the median voter | term limits | line item veto | sunset law |


Recommended Citation:

TIEBOUT HYPOTHESIS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: December 3, 2016].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: Tiebout hypothesis

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

PARADOX OF THRIFT

The notion that an increase in saving, which is generally good advice for an individual during bad economic times, can actually worsen the macroeconomy causing a reduction in aggregate income, production, and paradoxically a decrease in saving. The paradox of thrift is an example of the fallacy of composition stating that what is true for the part is not necessarily true for the whole.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Real Average Hourly Earnings
November 2015
$10.60
Up $.01 from October 2015

More Stats

GRAY SKITTERY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for the new strip mall out on the highway hoping to buy either a black duffle bag with velcro closures or any book written by Isaac Asimov. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

A thousand years before metal coins were developed, clay tablet "checks" were used as money by the Babylonians.
"Only great minds can afford a simple style."

-- Stendhal, writer

AACP
American Assocation of Commercial Publications
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2016 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster