Google
Saturday 
March 23, 2019 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
RISK POOLING: Combining the uncertainty of individuals into a calculable risk for large groups. For example, you may or may not contract the flu this year. However, if you're thrown in with 99,999 other people, then health-care types who spend their lives measuring the odds of an illness, can predict that 1 percent of the group, or 1,000 people, will get the flu. The uncertainty is that they probably don't know which 1,000 people, they only know the number afflicted. This little bit of information is what makes risk pooling possible. If the cost is $50 per illness, then an insurance company can insure your 100,000-member group against flu if they collect $50,000 ($50 x 1,000 sick people), or 50 cents per person. By agreeing to pay the cost of each sick person in exchange for the 50 cent payments, the insurance company has effectively pooled the risk of the group.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

LINE ITEM VETO: A policy intended to address the efficiency caused by legislative logrolling by giving executive officers who have veto authority over legislation (Presidents, Governors, Mayors), the ability to veto specific sections of a legislative act rather than the entire act. With a standard veto, the executive vetoes the entire piece of legislation. With line item veto, the executive can veto only parts of the legislation while signing the rest of it into law. While a line item veto is likely to reduce logrolling, it effectively gives the executive officer more power and authority.

     See also | public choice | term limits | sunset law | logrolling | explicit logrolling | majority rule | super majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | Tiebout hypothesis | principal-agent problem | principle of the median voter |


Recommended Citation:

LINE ITEM VETO, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: March 23, 2019].


Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

BUSINESS CYCLES

The recurring, but irregular, expansions and contractions of economic activity in the macroeconomy. While business cycles are frequently measured by real gross domestic product, they show up in many aggregate measures of economic activity, including the unemployment rate, the inflation rate, consumption expenditures, and tax collections, to name just a few. The study of macroeconomics is largely the study of business cycles. Macroeconomic theories seek to understand business cycles and macroeconomic policies seek to correct the problems of business cycles.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

WHITE GULLIBON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for rummage sales seeking to buy either a set of luggage without wheels or a how-to book on wine tasting. Be on the lookout for pencil sharpeners with an attitude.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

In the Middle Ages, pepper was used for bartering, and it was often more valuable and stable in value than gold.
"It is not the straining for great things that is most effective; it is the doing of the little things, the common duties, a little better and better."

-- Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Writer

NTB
Non-Tariff Barrier
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2019 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster