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April 29, 2016 

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AGGREGATE SUPPLY SHIFTS: Changes in the aggregate supply determinants can shift either the short-run aggregate supply curve and the long-run aggregate supply curve. The mechanism is comparable to that for market supply determinants and market supply. We have two options -- an increase in aggregate supply and a decrease in aggregate supply. An increase in resource quantity or quality or a decrease in resource prices shift the aggregate supply curves to right. A decrease in resource quantity or quality or an increase in resource prices shift the aggregate supply curves to left.

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SUPER MAJORITY RULE: A voting rule in which decisions are made based on a specified fraction of votes greater than 50 percent and less than 100 percent. For example, a super majority of two-thirds is required for Congress to override a legislative veto by the President. A growing number of state and local governments require a super majority approval, usually in the range of 60 to 75 percent, for an increase in taxes. This is one of several voting rules. Others include majority, unanimity, and plurality.

     See also | public choice | majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | voter paradox | principle of the median voter | logrolling | explicit logrolling | implicit logrolling | Tiebout hypothesis | principal-agent problem |


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ASSUMPTIONS, CLASSICAL ECONOMICS

Classical economics, especially as directed toward macroeconomics, relies on three key assumptions--flexible prices, Say's law, and saving-investment equality. Flexible prices ensure that markets adjust to equilibrium and eliminate shortages and surpluses. Say's law states that supply creates its own demand and means that enough income is generated by production to purchase the resulting production. The saving-investment equality ensures that any income leaked from consumption into saving is replaced by an equal amount of investment. Although of questionable realism, these three assumptions imply that the economy would operate at full employment.

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State of the ECONOMY

Housing Starts
November 2015
1,173,000
Up 10.5% from Oct. 2015: U.S. Dept. of Com.

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BEIGE MUNDORTLE
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching infomercials seeking to buy either a decorative windchime with plastic or a flower arrangement for that special day for your mother. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
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The Dow Jones family of stock market price indexes began with a simple average of 11 stock prices in 1884.
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