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July 23, 2016 

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WEIGHT GAINING: An activity in which the transportation cost of the output is greater than the transportation cost of the inputs. Using the term weight to mean transportation cost, an activity is said to gain weight if the cost of moving the output to the market is greater than the cost of getting the inputs to the factory. A weight-gaining activity has a greater attraction to, and tends to locate near, the market for the output.

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SUPER MAJORITY RULE: A voting rule in which decisions are made based on a specified fraction of votes greater than 50 percent and less than 100 percent. For example, a super majority of two-thirds is required for Congress to override a legislative veto by the President. A growing number of state and local governments require a super majority approval, usually in the range of 60 to 75 percent, for an increase in taxes. This is one of several voting rules. Others include majority, unanimity, and plurality.

     See also | public choice | majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | voter paradox | principle of the median voter | logrolling | explicit logrolling | implicit logrolling | Tiebout hypothesis | principal-agent problem |


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SUPER MAJORITY RULE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: July 23, 2016].


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE, MONOPSONY

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average factor cost incurred by a firm for employing an input and the quantity of input used. Because average factor cost is essentially the price of the input, the average factor cost curve is also the supply curve for the input. The average factor cost curve for a firm with no market control is horizontal. The average factor cost curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Sales of New Single-Family Homes
November 2015
490,000 (seasonal adjusted annual rate)
Up 4.3% from October 2015 Source: Econ Stats Adm.

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GRAY SKITTERY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall wanting to buy either a revolving spice rack or a how-to book on home repairs. Be on the lookout for door-to-door salesmen.
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This isn't me! What am I?

Mark Twain said "I wonder how much it would take to buy soap buble if there was only one in the world."
"The greatest use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it."

-- William James, psychologist

LBO
Leveraged Buyout
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