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April 20, 2014 

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KEYNESIAN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE: A modification of the standard aggregate supply curve used in the aggregate market (or AD-AD) analysis to reflect the basic assumptions of Keynesian economics. The Keynesian aggregate supply curve contains either two or three segments. The strict Keynesian aggregate supply curve contains two segments, a vertical classical range and a horizontal Keynesian range, meeting a right angle and forming a reverse L-shape. An alternative version replaces the right angle intersection with a gradual transition between the two segments that is positively sloped and termed the intermediate range. The modern aggregate supply curve is largely based on this intermediate range.

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PRINCIPLE OF THE MEDIAN VOTER: A voting principle stating that the median voter determines the outcome of an election governed by majority rule. The median voter is the one with an equal number of voters on either side of the vote. As such, the vote cast by THE median voter is the deciding or majority vote. However, this median voter's preference might not generate the best, that is, efficient, result.

     See also | public choice | majority rule | super majority rule | unanimity rule | plurality rule | voter paradox | logrolling | explicit logrolling | implicit logrolling | Tiebout hypothesis | principal-agent problem | principle of median location |


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PRINCIPLE OF THE MEDIAN VOTER, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: April 20, 2014].


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OLIGOPOLY AND MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION

Oligopoly and monopolistic competition have some similarities, but also have a few important differences. Both are examples of imperfect competition on the market structure continuum between ideals of perfect competition and monopoly. However, oligopoly contains a small number of large firms and monopolistic competition contains a large number of small firms. The dividing line between oligopoly and monopolistic competition can be blurred due to the number of firms in the industry.

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State of the ECONOMY

Wholesale Inventories
January 2014
$521.2 billion
Up 0.6% from Dec. 2013. Econ. Stat. Admin.

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RED AGGRESSERINE
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites looking to buy either a birthday gift for your grandfather or a pleather CD case. Be on the lookout for empty parking spaces that appear to be near the entrance to a store.
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There were no banks in colonial America before the U.S. Revolutionary War. Anyone seeking a loan did so from another individual.
"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."

-- Leslie Poles Hartley, Writer

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