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July 28, 2016 

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AGGLOMERATION ECONOMIES: A reduction in production cost the results when related firms locate near one another. Firms can be related as competitors in the same industry, by using the same inputs, or through providing output to the same demographic group. The fashion industry, for example, experiences agglomeration economies because they can share specialized inputs (photographers, models) that would be too expensive to employ full time. Retail stores have agglomeration economies when located in shopping malls because they have access to a large group of potential customers with lower advertising cost. Agglomeration economies is given as one of the primary reasons for the emergence of urban areas.

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PLURALITY RULE: A voting rule in which decisions are made based on a plurality of the votes cast. A plurality is defined as the most votes obtained when more than two candidates or options exist, but none receives a majority. If, for example, two of three candidates running for office receive 33 percent of the vote, then the third candidate with 34 percent receives the plurality. Presidential primary elections, which can have up to a dozen candidates, are commonly won with a plurality of the votes. This is one of several voting rules. Others include majority, super majority, and unanimity.

     See also | public choice | majority rule | super majority rule | unanimity rule | voter paradox | principle of the median voter | logrolling | explicit logrolling | implicit logrolling | Tiebout hypothesis | principal-agent problem |


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PLURALITY RULE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: July 28, 2016].


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SLOPE, GOVERNMENT PURCHASES LINE

The positive slope of the government purchases line is also termed the marginal propensity for government purchases (MPG). This slope is greater than zero but less than one, reflecting induced government purchases. The slope of the government purchases line affects the slope of the aggregate expenditures line and thus also affects the magnitude of the multiplier process.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Productivity
3rd Quarter 2015
Up 2.2% from 2nd Quarter 2015
Source: BLS

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RED AGGRESSERINE
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for the new strip mall out on the highway wanting to buy either a printer that works with your stockpile of ink cartridges or income tax software. Be on the lookout for slightly overweight pizza delivery guys.
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The average bank teller loses about $250 every year.
"How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world. "

-- Anne Frank, diarist

NELS
National Educational Longitudinal Survey
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