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December 12, 2018 

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L: This has two common uses. One is as the standard abbreviation for the quantity of labor, especially for the analysis of production. The complementary representations for other inputs are "K" for capital and "N" for population. The second is as the broadest monetary aggregate for the U.S. economy tracked by the Federal Reserve System, best thought of as total liquid assets. It was since be discontinued. In it's heyday, it was comprised of everything in M3 plus other liquid assets, including U.S. Treasury bills, commercial paper, and savings bonds. L was typically 15 to percent higher than M3 and seven times as much as M1. The Federal Reserve System discontinued this measurement in 1998.

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ASSUMPTION: An initial condition or statement that sets the stage for an analysis by abstracting from the real world. Assumptions are important to economic theories and economic analysis. Some assumptions are used to simplify a complex analysis into more easily manageable parts. These establish idealistic benchmarks that can be used to evaluate real world conditions. Other assumptions are used as control conditions that are subsequently changed to evaluate the effect of the change. The use of ceteris paribus assumptions in comparative statics analysis is an excellent example.

     See also | abstraction | theory | scientific method | science | economic analysis | marginal analysis | ceteris paribus | comparative statics | model | variable | hypothesis | principle | perfect competition |


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ASSUMPTION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: December 12, 2018].


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AVERAGE REVENUE PRODUCT CURVE

A curve that graphically illustrates the relation between average revenue product and the quantity of the variable input, holding all other inputs fixed. This curve indicates the per unit revenue at each level of the variable input. The average revenue product curve is one of two related curves often used in the analysis of factor demand. The other, and more important, is marginal revenue product curve.

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[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store seeking to buy either a printer that works with your stockpile of ink cartridges or income tax software. Be on the lookout for gnomes hiding in cypress trees.
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Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice in Wonderland, was the pseudonym of Charles Dodgson, an accomplished mathematician and economist.
"Defeat is simply a signal to press onward."

-- Helen Keller, lecturer, author

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Liquid Petroleum Gas
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