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February 9, 2023 

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ENTRY BARRIER: An institutional, government, technological, or economic restriction on the entry of firms into a market or industry. The four primary barriers to entry are: resource ownership, patents and copyrights, government restrictions, and start-up costs. Barriers to entry are a key reason for market control and the inefficiency that this generates. In particular, monopoly, oligopoly, monopsony, and oligopsony often owe their market control to assorted barriers to entry. By way of contrast, perfect competition, monopolistic competition, and monopsonistic competition have few if any barriers to entry and thus little or no market control.

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BANK FAILURE: In principle, this results when a bank's liabilities exceed assets for an extended period and the bank is forced to go out of business. This is comparable to other types of business that go bankrupt. However, because banks are heavily regulated by government entities, including the Federal Reserve System, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and Comptroller of the Currency, bank failure does not necessarily mean that the bank ceases to operated. In may cases, such a failure means the operation of the bank is take over by one of the government entities. The troubled bank might also be allowed or "encouraged" to merge with another, healthier bank.

     See also | bank | fractional-reserve banking | bankruptcy | deposits | loans | money supply | Federal Reserve System | financial intermediary | bank panic | Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation | Comptroller of the Currency | savings and loan association | credit union | mutual savings bank |


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CPI AND GDP PRICE DEFLATOR

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) and the GDP price deflator represent two alternative measures of the economy's price level and the inflation rate. The CPI is reported more often (monthly versus quarterly), but the GDP price deflator is a broader measure of the price level (all final production versus urban consumption). While the CPI is better known, economists tend to prefer the accuracy of the GDP price deflator.

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YELLOW CHIPPEROON
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a garage sale seeking to buy either shoe laces for your snow boots or a rim for your spare tire. Be on the lookout for slightly overweight pizza delivery guys.
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Paper money used by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts prior to the U.S. Revolutionary War, which was issued against the dictates of Britain, was designed by patriot and silversmith, Paul Revere.
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