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September 24, 2018 

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FACTOR SUPPLY DETERMINANTS: An ceteris paribus factors held constant when the factor supply curve is constructed that cause the curve to shift when they change. Because factor supply differs greatly depending on the particular factor analyzed (labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship), factor supply determinants also come from different sources. Several key determinants come from the five standard market supply determinants: (1) resource prices, (2) technology, (3) other prices, (4) sellers' expectations, and (5) number of sellers. However, because labor is people (who receive satisfaction from working) three additional determinants come from market demand: (1) income, (2) preferences, and (3) other prices. Last, but not least, is the mobility of resources, including both geographic and occupational mobility.

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BENEFIT-COST ANALYSIS: An analytical technique that compares the benefit generated by an activity with its opportunity cost of production. The rule is that if benefits exceed costs, then the activity is efficient and should be undertaken. In some cases the end result of benefit-cost analysis is net benefits, which is benefits minus cost. A positive value means the activity is efficient. In other cases the end result of benefit-cost analysis is a benefit-cost ratio, which is benefits divided by costs. A ratio greater than 1.0 is thus the indication of an efficient activity.

     See also | opportunity cost | efficiency | benefit-cost ratio | government | market | price | household | business | public good | good types | ability-to-pay principle | benefit principle |


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BENEFIT-COST ANALYSIS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 24, 2018].


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PRICE RATIONING

The distribution or allocation of a limited commodity using markets and prices. Rationing is needed due to the scarcity problem. Because wants and needs are unlimited, but resources are limited, available commodities must be rationed out to competing uses. Markets ration commodities by limiting the purchase only to those buyers willing and able to pay the price.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time lost in your local discount super center trying to buy either a video game player or an AC adapter that won't fry your computer. Be on the lookout for florescent light bulbs that hum folk songs from the sixties.
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