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April 21, 2024 

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REGULATORY FORCES: Forces in the marketing environment that depend on various government regulatory agencies that impact how an organization operates on a daily basis. An example is the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), which monitors advertising, deceptive labeling, and false or misleading information. Agencies such as the FTC have powers to enforce regulations through fines and other penalties. Other regulatory agencies are: Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

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COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE: The ability to produced one good at a relatively lower opportunity cost than other goods. While pointy-headed economists developed this idea for nations, it's extremely important for people. A comparative advantage means that no matter how good (or bad) you are at producing stuff, there's always something that you're best (or least worst) at doing. Moreover, because you can produce this one thing by giving up less than what others give up, you can sell it or trade it to them. This idea of comparative advantage means that people and nations can benefit by specialization and exchange. You do what you do best, then trade to someone else for what they do best. Both sides in this trade get more and are thus better off after than before.

     See also | foreign trade | export | import | opportunity cost | specialization | absolute advantage | foreign sector | exchange |


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COMPARATIVE ADVANTAGE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: April 21, 2024].


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INTERCEPT, NET EXPORTS LINE

The intercept of the net exports line indicates autonomous net exports, net exports that do not depend on the level of domestic income or production. This can be thought of as net exports, exports minus imports, that the foreign sector undertakes regardless of the state of the economy. Autonomous net exports are affected by the net exports determinants, which cause a change in the intercept and a shift of the net exports line.

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Okun's Law posits that the unemployment rate increases by 1% for every 2% gap between real GDP and full-employment real GDP.
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