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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES LINE: A line representing the relation between aggregate expenditures and gross domestic product used in the Keynesian cross. The aggregate expenditure line is obtained by adding investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line. As such, the slope of the aggregate expenditure line is largely based on the slope of the consumption line (which is the marginal propensity to consume), with adjustments coming from the marginal propensity to invest, the marginal propensity for government purchases, and the marginal propensity to import. The intersection of the aggregate expenditures line and the 45-degree line identifies the equilibrium level of output in the Keynesian cross.

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FOREIGN TRADE: Exchange of goods and services between countries. The inclination for one country to trade with another is based in large part on the idea of comparative advantage--which says that any country, no matter how technologically disadvantaged it might be, can always find some sort of good that will let it enter the game of foreign trade. In this sense, foreign trade is just an extension of the production, exchange, and consumption that's a fundamental part of life. The only difference with foreign trade is that producers and consumers reside in separate countries.

     See also | foreign | comparative advantage | absolute advantage | production | consumption | exchange | efficiency | exchange rate | import | export | trade barriers | balance of trade | trading bloc |


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SAVING FUNCTION

A mathematical relation between saving and income by the household sector. The saving function can be stated as an equation, usually a simple linear equation, or as a diagram designated as the saving line. This function captures the saving-income relation, the flip side of the consumption-income relation that forms one of the key building blocks for Keynesian economics. The two key parameters of the saving function are the intercept term, which indicates autonomous saving, and the slope, which is the marginal propensity to save and indicates induced saving. The injections-leakages model used in Keynesian economics is based on the saving function.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market looking to buy either a wall poster commemorating yesterday or pink cotton balls. Be on the lookout for empty parking spaces that appear to be near the entrance to a store.
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In the early 1900s around 300 automobile companies operated in the United States.
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