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April 13, 2021 

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COMPLEMENT-IN-CONSUMPTION: One of two goods that are consumed together to provide satisfaction -- that is, the goods are used jointly to satisfy wants and needs. A complement good is one of two alternatives falling within the other prices determinant of demand. The other is a substitute good. An increase in the price of one complement good causes a decrease in demand for the other. A complement good has a negative cross price elasticity. When the terms complements or complement goods are used, they typically means complement-in-consumption (compare this with complement-in-production). Examples of complement goods are golf clubs and golf balls; hamburgers and french fries; and cars and gasoline. In each case, the two goods "go together." People seldom use or consume one without the other.

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DECREASING-COST INDUSTRY: A perfectly competitive industry with a negatively-sloped long-run industry supply curve that results because expansion of the industry causes lower production cost and resource prices. For a decreasing-cost industry the entry of new firms, prompted by an increase in demand, causes the long-run average supply curve of each firm to shift downward, which decreases the minimum efficient scale of production.

     See also | perfect competition | supply | supply curve | industry | demand increase | minimum efficient scale | production cost | resource prices | economies of scale | increasing-cost industry | constant-cost industry |


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DECREASING-COST INDUSTRY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2021. [Accessed: April 13, 2021].


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MARGINAL REVENUE CURVE, MONOPOLY

A curve that graphically represents the relation between the marginal revenue received by a monopoly for selling its output and the quantity of output sold. Because a monopoly is a price maker and faces a negatively-sloped demand curve, its marginal revenue curve is also negatively sloped and lies below its average revenue (and demand) curve. A monopoly maximizes profit by producing the quantity of output found at the intersection of the marginal revenue curve and marginal cost curve.

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