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October 17, 2018 

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HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTION: The creation of satisfaction using both goods purchased in markets and the uncompensated efforts of consumers. In other words, while you might buy stuff from the store, you often need to do something to it before it's ready to use. Probably the most common example is cooking a meal. You buy some pasta noodles, a jar of alfredo sauce, and a frozen package of bite-sized shrimp at the store, then use a little bit of your time and effort to prepare a tasty Italian meal.

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DIAMOND-WATER PARADOX: The perplexing observation that water, which is more useful than diamonds, has a lower price. If price is related to utility, how can this occur? This paradox was first proposed by classical economists in the 19th century and was subsequently used as a stepping stone for developing the notion of marginal utility and the role it plays in the demand price of a good. The paradox is magically cleared up with an understanding of marginal utility and total utility. People are willing to pay a higher price for goods with greater marginal utility. As such, water which is plentiful has enormous total utility, but a low price because of a low marginal utility. Diamonds, however, have less total utility because they are less plentiful, but a high price because of a high marginal utility.

     See also | price | demand price | utility | marginal utility | total utility | consumer surplus | law of diminishing marginal utility | marginal utility-price ratio | marginal utility and demand |


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DIAMOND-WATER PARADOX, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: October 17, 2018].


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RISK PREFERENCES

Three alternative views concerning the choice between a risky outcome and a certain outcome -- risk aversion, risk neutrality, and risk loving. Some people prefer to avoid risk (risk aversion), others enjoy engaging in risk (risk loving), and still others are indifferent (risk neutrality). Most people are risk averse, which underlies the provision of insurance. Others who are risk loving are more inclined to gamble, play the stock market, and be entrepreneurs.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store seeking to buy either a three-hole paper punch or decorative picture frames. Be on the lookout for pencil sharpeners with an attitude.
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The standard "debt" notation I.O.U. does not mean "I owe you," but actually stands for "I owe unto..."
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