March 17, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
FACTOR MARKET: A market used to exchange the services of a factor of production: labor, capital, land , and entrepreneurship. Factor markets, also termed resource markets, exchange the services of factors, NOT the factors themselves. For example, the labor services of workers are exchanged through factor markets NOT the actual workers. Buying and selling the actual workers is not only slavery (which is illegal) it's also the type of exchange that would take place through product markets, not factor markets. More realistically, capital and land are two resources than can be and are legally exchanged through product markets. The services of these resources, however, are exchanged through factor markets. The value of the services exchanged through factor markets each year is measured as national income.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

MARGINAL UTILITY: The additional utility, or satisfaction of wants and needs, obtained from the consumption or use of an additional unit of a good. It is specified as the change in total utility divided by the change in quantity. Marginal utility indicates what each additional unit of a good is worth to a consumer.

     See also | utility | satisfaction | consumption | total utility | quantity | marginal analysis | law of demand | consumer demand theory | law of diminishing marginal utility | marginal utility and demand | demand price | diamond-water paradox |

Recommended Citation:

MARGINAL UTILITY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama,, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: March 17, 2018].

AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: marginal utility

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama


Taxes and transfer payments that depend on the level of aggregate production and income such that they automatically dampen business-cycle instability without the need for discretionary policy action. Automatic stabilizers are a form of nondiscretionary fiscal policy that do not require explicit action by the government sector to address the ups and downs of the business cycle and the problems of unemployment and inflation.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at an auction hoping to buy either storage boxes for your winter clothes or several magazines on time travel. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Junk bonds are so called because they have a better than 50% chance of default, carrying a Standard & Poor's rating of CC or lower.
"If football taught me anything about business, it is that you win the game one play at a time."

-- Fran Tarkenton, Football Player

Depository Institutions Deregulation Committee
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback

| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2018 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster