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June 15, 2024 

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YIELD: The rate of return on a financial asset. In some simple cases, the yield on a financial asset, like commercial paper, corporate bond, or government security, is the asset's interest rate. However, as a more general rule, the yield includes both the interest earned from an asset plus any changes in the asset's price. Suppose, for example, that a $100,000 bond has a 10 percent interest rate, such that the holder receives $10,000 interest per year. If the price of the bond increases over the course of the year from $100,000 to $105,000, then the bond's yield is greater than 10 percent. It includes the $10,000 interest plus the $5,000 bump in the price, giving a yield of 15 percent. Because bonds and similar financial assets often have fixed interest payments, their prices and subsequently yields move up and down as economic conditions change.

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LAW OF DEMAND: The inverse relationship between demand price and the quantity demanded, ceteris paribus. This fundamental economic principle indicates that as the price of a commodity decreases, then the quantity of the commodity that buyers are able and willing to purchase in a given period of time, if other factors are held constant, increases. This law is incredibly important to the study of economics. If you compiled a top ten list of economically important laws, the law of demand would be right there at the top.

     See also | demand | demand price | quantity demanded | law | ceteris paribus | principle | scientific method | cause and effect | demand curve | slope | income effect | substitution effect | purchasing power | substitute | law of supply | market |


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GOVERNMENT SUBSIDIES LESS CURRENT SURPLUS OF GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES

The difference between transfer payments from the government sector to the business sector and "profit" received by government-operated "firms." This composite item is one of several differences between national income (the resource cost of production) and gross (and net) domestic product (the market value of production) in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. This item tends to be relatively small, invariably less than 1 percent of gross domestic product.

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Much of the $15 million used by the United States to finance the Louisiana Purchase from France was borrowed from European banks.
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