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October 23, 2014 

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IMPACT LAG: In the context of economic policies, the time between corrective government action responding to a shock to the economy and the resulting affect on the economy. This is one of four lags in the use of economic policies. The others are recognition lag, decision lag, and action lag. The length of the impact lag, also termed outside lag, is primarily based on the speed of the multiplier process and is essentially the same for both fiscal and monetary policy. The length of the policy lags is one argument against the use of discretionary policies to stability business cycles.

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EXTERNALITIES: Costs or benefits that are not included in the market price of a good because they are not included in the supply price or the demand price. Pollution is an example of an externality cost if producers aren't the ones who suffer from pollution damages. Education is an example of an externality benefit when members of society other than students benefit from a more educated population. Externality is one type of market failure that causes inefficiency.

     See also | opportunity cost | market | supply price | demand price | market failure | efficiency | pollution | materials balance | good types | Pigouvian tax | Coase theorem |


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EXTERNALITIES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: October 23, 2014].


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TIGHT MONEY

A general condition of the economy in which money is not relatively abundant nor plentiful. In modern times, this condition arises when the monetary authority (Federal Reserve System) undertakes contractionary monetary policy. With tight money, interest rates are generally higher and inflation tends to remain low. The alternative to tight money is easy money.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Unemployment
August 2014
6.1% Down slightly
Bureau of Labor Statistics

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GREEN LOGIGUIN
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market trying to buy either a how-to book on meeting people or clothing for your pet iguana. Be on the lookout for strangers with large satchels of used undergarments.
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Paper money used by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts prior to the U.S. Revolutionary War, which was issued against the dictates of Britain, was designed by patriot and silversmith, Paul Revere.
"When we do the best we can, we never know what miracle is wrought in our life or in the life of another. "

-- Helen Keller, lecturer, author

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