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September 1, 2014 

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AGGREGATE MARKET SHOCKS: Disruptions of the equilibrium in the aggregate market (or AS-AD model) caused by shifts of the aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, or long-run aggregate supply curves. Shocks of the aggregate market are associated with, and thus used to analyze, assorted macroeconomic phenomena such as business cycles, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and economic growth. The specific analysis of aggregate market shocks identifies changes in the price level (GDP price deflator) and real production (real GDP). However, changes in the price level and real production have direct implications for the unemployment rate, the inflation rate, national income, and a host of other macroeconomic measures.

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EXTERNALITIES: Costs or benefits that are not included in the market price of a good because they are not included in the supply price or the demand price. Pollution is an example of an externality cost if producers aren't the ones who suffer from pollution damages. Education is an example of an externality benefit when members of society other than students benefit from a more educated population. Externality is one type of market failure that causes inefficiency.

     See also | opportunity cost | market | supply price | demand price | market failure | efficiency | pollution | materials balance | good types | Pigouvian tax | Coase theorem |


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EXTERNALITIES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: September 1, 2014].


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KEYNESIAN DISEQUILIBRIUM

The state of the Keynesian model in which aggregate expenditures are not equal to aggregate production, which results in an imbalance that induces a change in aggregate production. In other words, the opposing forces of aggregate expenditures (the buyers) and aggregate production (the sellers) are out of balance. At the existing level of aggregate production, either the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) are unable to purchase all of the production that they seek or producers are unable to sell all of the production that they have.

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State of the ECONOMY

Business Inventories
June 2014
$1,743.1 billion
Up 0.4% from May 2014: Econ. Stat. Admin.

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YELLOW CHIPPEROON
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling around a discount warehouse buying club seeking to buy either a coffee cup commemorating yesterday or a replacement remote control for your television. Be on the lookout for deranged pelicans.
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Okun's Law posits that the unemployment rate increases by 1% for every 2% gap between real GDP and full-employment real GDP.
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