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March 27, 2015 

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HYPOTHESIS: A reasonable proposition about the workings of the world that's inspired or implied by a theory and which may or may not be true. An hypothesis is essentially a prediction made by a theory that can be compared with observations in the real world. Hypotheses usually take the form: "If A, the also B." The essence of the scientific method is to test, or verify, hypotheses against real world data. If supported by data over and over again, hypotheses become principles.

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EXTERNALITIES: Costs or benefits that are not included in the market price of a good because they are not included in the supply price or the demand price. Pollution is an example of an externality cost if producers aren't the ones who suffer from pollution damages. Education is an example of an externality benefit when members of society other than students benefit from a more educated population. Externality is one type of market failure that causes inefficiency.

     See also | opportunity cost | market | supply price | demand price | market failure | efficiency | pollution | materials balance | good types | Pigouvian tax | Coase theorem |


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EXTERNALITIES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2015. [Accessed: March 27, 2015].


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PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE

The different stages that a product traverses over the course of its life from initial availability (birth) to eventual unavailability (death). The key stages are development, introduction, growth, maturity, saturation, and decline. The product life cycle, represented by an S-shaped curve, is an adaptation of the biological life cycle and is common to the study of marketing. It is also important in the analysis of innovation and economic instability. In addition to biological growth, comparable S-shaped life cycles are found in short-run production of a firm, the growth of a person's income, the acquisition of knowledge, and the development of a civilization.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

U.S. National Debt
January 20, 2015
$18,090,470,559,563.95
$56,560.07 per person: U.S. Debt Clock

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PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through the yellow pages looking to buy either a how-to book on surfing the Internet or a computer that can play music and burn CDs. Be on the lookout for deranged pelicans.
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The word "fiscal" is derived from a Latin word meaning "moneybag."
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