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July 17, 2018 

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YTM: The common abbreviation for yield to maturity, which is the annual rate of return on a financial asset that is held until maturity. Yield to maturity depends on both the coupon rate and the face or par value paid at maturity. If the selling price of a financial asset is equal to its par value, then the yield to maturity is equal to the current yield and the coupon rate. However, if the asset is selling at a discount, then the yield to maturity exceeds the current yield, which is greater than the coupon rate. And if the asset is selling at a premium, then the yield to maturity is less than the current yield, which is below than the coupon rate.

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FIAT MONEY: A medium of exchange (money) with value in exchange, but little or no value in use. Modern paper currency, coins, and checkable deposits are fiat money. The value of fiat money comes from the public's general willingness to accept it in exchange for other goods. This willingness comes from the fact that EVERYONE is willing to accept fiat money in exchange, which largely depends on the public's confidence in the authority (usually government) issuing the fiat money. Fiat money is NOT valuable unto itself, but it is valuable for what it can buy.

     See also | money | medium of exchange | commodity money | value in use | value in exchange | barter | money functions | money characteristics | monetary policy | currency | Federal Reserve note | gold certificate | silver certificate |


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FIAT MONEY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: July 17, 2018].


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CREATIVE DESTRUCTION

A fundamental process of capitalism, popularized by Joseph Schumpeter, in which the benefits of growth and prosperity induced by innovations also result in the costs of disrupting existing means of production. The creation of new activity involves the destruction of existing activity. This notion attributes business-cycle instability to innovations, including both the expansionary rise of prosperity, as well as a contractionary decline. Creative destruction is based on the idea that rather than tending toward equilibrium, the economy is largely in flux. A key question is one of cause and effect. Does innovation cause destruction or does destruction induce innovation?

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a garage sale hoping to buy either a wall poster commemorating yesterday or pink cotton balls. Be on the lookout for rusty deck screws.
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The standard "debt" notation I.O.U. does not mean "I owe you," but actually stands for "I owe unto..."
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