Google
Friday 
September 20, 2019 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
GOVERNMENT PURCHASES LINE: A graphical depiction of the relation between government purchases and national income (or gross domestic product) that plays a role in Keynesian economics and the Keynesian cross. The slope of this line is positive, greater than zero, less than one, and goes by the name marginal propensity for government purchases. The vertical intercept of this line is autonomous government purchases. The aggregate expenditures line used in the Keynesian cross is obtained by adding this government purchases line, as well as, investment expenditures and net exports, to the consumption line. The government purchases line is also combined with investment expenditures for the Keynesian saving-investment model.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

FINAL GOODS: Goods (or services) that are available for purchase by the ultimate or intended user with no plans for further physical transformation or as an input in the production of other goods that will be resold. Gross domestic product seeks to measure the market value of final goods. Final goods are purchased through product markets by the four basic macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) as consumption expenditures, investment expenditures, government purchases, and exports. Final goods, which are closely related to the term current production, should be contrasted with intermediate goods--goods (and services) that will be further processed before reaching their ultimate user.

     See also | good | intermediate good | gross domestic product | household sector | business sector | government sector | foreign sector | aggregate expenditures | consumption expenditures | investment expenditures | government purchases | net exports |


Recommended Citation:

FINAL GOODS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: September 20, 2019].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: final goods

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

CLASSICAL ECONOMICS

A theory of economics, especially directed toward macroeconomics, based on the unrestricted workings of markets and the pursuit of individual self interests. Classical economics relies on three key assumptions--flexible prices, Say's law, and saving-investment equality--in the analysis of macroeconomics. The primary implications of this theory are that markets automatically achieve equilibrium and in so doing maintain full employment of resources without the need for government intervention. Classical economics emerged from the foundations laid by Adam Smith in his book An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, published in 1776. Although it fell out of favor in the 1930s, many classical principles remain important to modern macroeconomic theories, especially aggregate market (AS-AD) analysis, rational expectations theory, and supply-side economics.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

BLUE PLACIDOLA
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling around a discount warehouse buying club seeking to buy either a how-to book on home remodeling or a tall storage cabinet with five shelves and a secure lock. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The first U.S. fire insurance company was established by Benjamin Franklin in 1752 in Philadelphia.
"No amount of business school training or work experience can teach what is ultimately a matter of personal character. "

-- Truett Cathy, Chick-fil-A Inc. founder

NABB
National Association of Business Brokers
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2019 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster