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December 15, 2018 

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BREAKEVEN OUTPUT: The quantity of output in which the total revenue is equal to total cost such that a firm earns exactly a normal profit, but no economic profit. Breakeven output can be identified by the intersection of the total revenue curve and total cost curve, or by the intersection of the average total cost curve and average revenue curve. The most straightforward way of noting breakeven output, however, is with the profit curve. For a perfectly competitive firm breakeven output occurs where price is equal to average total cost.

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INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS: A branch of economics that studies economic interactions among different countries, including foreign trade (exports and imports), foreign exchange (trading currency), balance of payments, and balance of trade. While much of the interaction among countries is largely an extension of basic economic principles, complications do arise because nations are distinct political entities, with different laws and cultures, and with little or no overall governmental oversight. The guiding principle in the study of international economics is comparative advantage, which indicates that every country, no matter their level of development, can find something that it can produce cheaper than another country. The study of interational economics focusses on two related areas -- international trade and international finance

     See also | international trade | international finance | balance of trade | balance of payments | comparative advantage | foreign | domestic |


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INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: December 15, 2018].


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GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES

Government owned and operated productive activities that operate much like private sector firms. They hire resources and purchase other inputs, then produce goods sold through markets. In some cases, government enterprises compete directly with private firms. One common example of a government enterprise is a city-operated electrical generation and distribution system. In some cities, this service is provided by private, for-profit, businesses. In other cities it is provided by government. Other examples of government enterprises include urban transportation systems, parks and recreational facilities, and communication systems.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites looking to buy either a small palm tree that will fit on your coffee table or several magazines on fashion design. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
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A thousand years before metal coins were developed, clay tablet "checks" were used as money by the Babylonians.
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