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AGGREGATE DEMAND DETERMINANTS: An assortment of ceteris paribus factors that affect aggregate demand, but which are assumed constant when the aggregate demand curve is constructed. Changes in any of the aggregate demand determinants cause the aggregate demand curve to shift. While a wide variety of specific ceteris paribus factors can cause the aggregate demand curve to shift, it's usually most convenient to group them into the four, broad expenditure categories -- consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports. The reason is that changes in these expenditures are the direct cause of shifts in the aggregate demand curve. If any determinant affects aggregate demand it MUST affect one of these four expenditures.

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INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS: A branch of economics that studies economic interactions among different countries, including foreign trade (exports and imports), foreign exchange (trading currency), balance of payments, and balance of trade. While much of the interaction among countries is largely an extension of basic economic principles, complications do arise because nations are distinct political entities, with different laws and cultures, and with little or no overall governmental oversight. The guiding principle in the study of international economics is comparative advantage, which indicates that every country, no matter their level of development, can find something that it can produce cheaper than another country. The study of interational economics focusses on two related areas -- international trade and international finance

     See also | international trade | international finance | balance of trade | balance of payments | comparative advantage | foreign | domestic |


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ELASTICITY

The relative response of one variable to changes in another variable. Elasticity is commonly used in the study of market exchanges to identify the relative response of quantity (demanded and supplied) to changes in price. The phrase "relative response" is best interpreted as the percentage change, such as, the percentage change in quantity measured against the percentage change in price. The most common notions of elasticity are the price elasticity of demand and the price elasticity of supply. Other notable economic elasticities are the income elasticity of demand and the cross elasticity of demand.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling through a department store looking to buy either a weathervane with a chicken on top or a flower arrangement with daisies and carnations for your uncle. Be on the lookout for letters from the Internal Revenue Service.
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The portion of aggregate output U.S. citizens pay in taxes (30%) is less than the other six leading industrialized nations -- Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, or Japan.
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