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December 11, 2018 

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AD CURVE: The aggregate demand curve, which is a graphical representation of the relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate demand determinants constant. The aggregate demand, or AD, curve is one side of the graphical presentation of the aggregate market. The other side is occupied by the aggregate supply curve (which is actually two curves, the long-run aggregate supply curve and the short-run aggregate supply curve). The negative slope of the aggregate demand curve captures the inverse relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level. This negative slope is attributable to the interest-rate effect, real-balance effect, and net-export effect.

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LIQUIDITY: The ease of converting an asset into money (either checking accounts or currency) in a timely fashion with little or no loss in value. Money is the standard for liquidity because it is, well, money and no conversion is needed. Other assets, both financial and physical have varying degrees of liquidity. Savings accounts, certificates of deposit, and money market accounts are highly liquid. Stocks, bonds, and are another step down in liquidity. While they can be "cashed in," price fluctuations, brokerage fees, and assorted transactions expenses tend to reduce their money value. Physical assets, like houses, cars, furniture, clothing, food, and the like have substantially less liquidity.

     See also | money | asset | value | checkable deposits | currency | M1 | corporate stock | bond | government securities |


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LIQUIDITY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: December 11, 2018].


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VERTICAL MERGER

The consolidation of two or more separately-owned businesses, that have an input-output relation, into a single firm. This is one of three types of mergers. The other two are horizontal merger--two competing firms in the same industry that sell the same products--and conglomerate merger--two firms in separate, unrelated industries.

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BLACK DISMALAPOD
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store looking to buy either throw pillows for your bed or a package of blank rewritable CDs. Be on the lookout for strangers with large satchels of used undergarments.
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The Dow Jones family of stock market price indexes began with a simple average of 11 stock prices in 1884.
"There comes a time when the mind takes a higher plane of knowledge but can never prove how it got there. "

-- Albert Einstein, physicist

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