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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURE DETERMINANT: A ceteris paribus factor that affects aggregate expenditures, but which is assumed constant when the aggregate expenditure line is constructed. Changes in any of the aggregate expenditures determinants cause the aggregate expenditure line to shift. While a wide variety of specific ceteris paribus factors can cause the aggregate expenditure line to shift, it's usually most convenient to group them into the four, broad expenditure categories -- consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports. The reason is that changes in these expenditures are the direct cause of shifts in the aggregate expenditure line. If any determinant affects aggregate expenditures it MUST affect one of these four expenditures.

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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE: A curve that graphically represents the relation between factor quantity and the marginal factor cost incurred by a firm for buying or hiring a factor of production. Marginal factor cost curve indicates how a firm's total factor cost is affected by hiring one more or one fewer worker. This curve is constructed to capture the relation between marginal factor cost and the factor quantity, holding other variables constant.

     See also | marginal factor cost | curve | marginal cost | input | factors of production | factor markets | average factor cost curve | marginal revenue product curve | perfect competition | factor markets | perfectly elastic | factor price | imperfect competition | monopsony | factor supply curve |


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 20, 2018].


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INFLATION CAUSES

Inflation, the persistent increase in the average price level, can be caused by an increase in aggregate demand or a decrease in aggregate supply. This suggests two basics sources, causes, or types of inflation--demand-pull inflation and cost-push inflation. While short-term bouts of inflation (up to several months) can result from anything (determinant) that might cause either increases in aggregate demand or decreases in aggregate supply, long-term inflation (a year or more) is possible ONLY through persistent increases in the money supply. As such, while demand-pull inflation and cost-push inflation are convenient ways to catalog the transmission mechanisms of inflation, the ultimate CAUSE of inflation is money.

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