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December 15, 2018 

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CAPITALISM: A type of economy based on -- (1) private ownership of most resources, goods, and other stuff (private property); (2) freedom to generally use the privately-owned resources, goods, and other stuff to get the most wages, rent, interest, and profit possible; and (3) a system of relatively competitive markets. While government establishes the legal "rules of the game" for capitalism and provides assorted public goods, like national defense, education, and infrastructure, most production, consumption, and resource allocation decisions are left up to individual businesses and consumers. The term capitalism is derived from the notion that capital goods are under private, rather than government, ownership (compare communism, socialism.

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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE: A curve that graphically represents the relation between factor quantity and the marginal factor cost incurred by a firm for buying or hiring a factor of production. Marginal factor cost curve indicates how a firm's total factor cost is affected by hiring one more or one fewer worker. This curve is constructed to capture the relation between marginal factor cost and the factor quantity, holding other variables constant.

     See also | marginal factor cost | curve | marginal cost | input | factors of production | factor markets | average factor cost curve | marginal revenue product curve | perfect competition | factor markets | perfectly elastic | factor price | imperfect competition | monopsony | factor supply curve |


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FLEXIBLE PRICES

The proposition that prices adjust in the long run in response to market shortages or surpluses. This condition is most important for long-run macroeconomic activity and long-run aggregate market analysis. In particular, flexible prices are the key reason for the vertical slope of the long-run aggregate supply curve. This proposition is also central to the original classical theory of macroeconomics and to modern variations, including rational expectations, new classical theory, and supply-side economics.

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