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RENEWABLE RESOURCE: A natural resource that can be increased by either automatically through the natural forces of the environment or through actions undertaken by people. The quantities of renewable resources and not fixed and thus the amounts available for use tomorrow can be increased. Efficient use of renewable resources requires a balance between the rate of use and the rate of renewal. It is possible to efficiently use renewable resources indefinitely. However, such resources can also be exhausted if the rate of use exceeds the rate of renewal. Common examples of renewable resources are plant life, animal life, clean air, and clean water.

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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE: A curve that graphically represents the relation between factor quantity and the marginal factor cost incurred by a firm for buying or hiring a factor of production. Marginal factor cost curve indicates how a firm's total factor cost is affected by hiring one more or one fewer worker. This curve is constructed to capture the relation between marginal factor cost and the factor quantity, holding other variables constant.

     See also | marginal factor cost | curve | marginal cost | input | factors of production | factor markets | average factor cost curve | marginal revenue product curve | perfect competition | factor markets | perfectly elastic | factor price | imperfect competition | monopsony | factor supply curve |


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: June 24, 2024].


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SECOND-DEGREE PRICE DISCRIMINATION

A form of price discrimination in which a seller charges different prices for different quantities of a good. This also goes by the name block pricing. Second-degree price discrimination is possible because decidedly different quantities are purchased by different types of buyers with different demand elasticities. This is one of three price discrimination degrees. The others are first-degree price discrimination and third-degree price discrimination.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching the shopping channel trying to buy either a birthday gift for your father that doesn't look like every other birthday gift for your father or a green fountain pen. Be on the lookout for poorly written technical manuals.
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Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice in Wonderland, was the pseudonym of Charles Dodgson, an accomplished mathematician and economist.
"It is not fair to ask of others what you are unwilling to do yourself. "

-- Eleanor Roosevelt, diplomat, activist

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