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BEA: The abbreviation for the Bureau of Economic Analysis, which is an agency of the U.S. Federal government, specifically a branch of the U.S. Department of Commerce, that compiles and reports a wide range of economic data and measurements. At the top of their list of important economic numbers maintained by the BEA, is the National Income and Product Accounts, which includes gross domestic product and the broad assortment of related measures of income and production. Economists rely heavily on the BEA to provide data needed to evaluate and analyze the macroeconomy.

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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE: A curve that graphically represents the relation between average factor cost incurred by a firm for buying or hiring a factor of production and the factor quantity. Because average factor cost is essentially factor price, the average factor cost curve (in most circumstances) is also the factor supply curve facing the firm. This curve is constructed to capture the relation between average factor cost and the factor quantity, holding other variables constant.

     See also | curve | average factor cost | total factor cost | factor price | factor supply curve | marginal factor cost | factor markets | perfect competition | monopsony | market control | average cost |


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: April 25, 2018].


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PERFECT COMPETITION

An ideal market structure characterized by a large number of small firms, identical products sold by all firms, freedom of entry into and exit out of the industry, and perfect knowledge of prices and technology. This is one of four basic market structures. The other three are monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition. Perfect competition is an idealized market structure that is not observed in the real world. While unrealistic, it does provide an excellent benchmark that can be used to analyze real world market structures. In particular, perfect competition efficiently allocates resources.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a dollar discount store hoping to buy either a handcrafted bird feeder or a New York Yankees baseball cap. Be on the lookout for infected paper cuts.
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The 22.6% decline in stock prices on October 19, 1987 was larger than the infamous 12.8% decline on October 29, 1929.
"The greatest things ever done on Earth have been done little by little. "

-- William Jennings Bryan

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