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CBO: The abbreviation of Congressional Budget Office, which is a Congressional agency that provides Congress with information needed for various economic and budget decisions. Established in 1974, the CBO is responsible for providing Congress with objective, timely, nonpartisan analyses used for economic and budget decisions. A key task is to generate information and estimates required for the Congressional budget process. The Presidential counterpart of the CBO is the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). And unlike the OMB, every attempt is made to ensure that the CBO is nonpartisan and objective. It does not recommend policies, but only presents alternatives.

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MARGINAL FACTOR COST, PERFECT COMPETITION: The change in total factor cost resulting from a change in the quantity of factor input employed by a perfectly competitive firm. Marginal factor cost, abbreviated MFC, indicates how total factor cost changes with the employment of one more input. It is found by dividing the change in total factor cost by the change in the quantity of input used. Marginal factor cost is compared with marginal revenue product to identify the profit-maximizing quantity of input to hire.

     See also | marginal factor cost | marginal factor cost curve, perfect competition | marginal factor cost, monopsony | total factor cost | marginal factor cost curve | average factor cost curve | total cost | total product | total factor cost, perfect competition | total factor cost, monopsony |


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST, PERFECT COMPETITION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: December 16, 2018].


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SHORTAGE

A condition in the market in which the quantity demanded is greater than the quantity supplied at the existing price. Because buyers are unable to buy as much of the good as they want, a shortage generally causes an increase in the market price, which then acts to restore equilibrium. A shortage, which also goes by the terms excess demand and sellers' market, is one of two basic states of disequilibrium for the market. The other is surplus.

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ORANGE REBELOON
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall hoping to buy either a lighted magnifying glass or a small, foam rubber football. Be on the lookout for high interest rates.
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On a typical day, the United States Mint produces over $1 million worth of dimes.
"If things are not going well with you, begin your effort at correcting the situation by carefully examining the service you are rendering, and especially the spirit in which you are rendering it."

-- Roger Babson, statistician and columnist

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