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WPI: The abbreviation for Wholesale Price Index, which is an index of the prices paid by retail stores for the products they would ultimately resell to consumers. The Wholesale Price Index, abbreviated WPI, was the forerunner of the modern Producer Price Index (PPI). The WPI was first published in 1902, and was one of the more important economic indicators available to policy makers until it was replaced by the PPI in 1978. The change to Producer Price Index in 1978 reflected, as much as a name change, a change in focus of this index away from the limited wholesaler-to-retailer transaction to encompass all stages of production. While the WPI is no longer available, the family of producer price indexes provides a close counterpart in the Finished Goods Price Index.

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NET-EXPORT EFFECT: A change in aggregate expenditures on real production, especially net exports through the foreign sector, that results because a change in the price level alters the relative prices of exports and imports. The net-export effect, also termed the international-substitution effect, is one of three effects underlying the negative slope of the aggregate demand curve associated with a movement along the aggregate demand curve and a change in aggregate expenditures. The other two are real-balance effect and interest-rate effect.

     See also | aggregate demand | aggregate expenditures | aggregate demand curve | real-balance effect | interest-rate effect | imports | exports | net exports | exchange rate | foreign |


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GROSS PRIVATE DOMESTIC INVESTMENT

This is the official item in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economics Analysis measuring capital investment expenditures. Gross private domestic investment is expenditures on capital goods to be used for productive activities in the domestic economy that are undertaken by the business sector during a given time period. These expenditures tend to be the least stable of the four expenditures, averaging between 12-18 percent of gross domestic product. This percentage tends to be at the low end during business-cycle contractions and at the high end during business-cycle expansions. The other official expenditures included in the National Income and Product Accounts are personal consumption expenditures, government consumption expenditures and gross investment, and net exports of goods and services.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store wanting to buy either a package of 4 by 6 index cards, the ones with lines or a 50 foot extension cord. Be on the lookout for deranged pelicans.
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In the early 1900s around 300 automobile companies operated in the United States.
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