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May 28, 2015 

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ABSOLUTE POVERTY: The amount of income a person or family needs to purchase an absolute amount of the basic necessities of life. These basic necessities are identified in terms of calories of food, BTUs of energy, square feet of living space, etc. The problem with the absolute poverty level is that there really are no absolutes when in comes to consuming goods. You can consume a given poverty level of calories eating relatively expensive steak, relatively inexpensive pasta, or garbage from a restaurant dumpster. The income needed to acquire each of these calorie "minimums" vary greatly. That's why some prefer relative poverty.

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EXPORTS: The sale of goods to a foreign country. The United States, for example, sells a lot of the stuff produced within our boundaries to other countries, including wheat, beef, cars, furniture, and, well, almost every variety of product you care to name. In general, domestic producers (and their workers) are elated with the prospect of selling their goods to foreign countries--leading to more buyers, a higher price, and more profit. The higher price, however, is bad for domestic consumers. In that domestic consumers tend to have far less political clout than producers, very few criticisms of exports can be heard. On the positive side, though, exports do tend to add to the multiplicative, cumulatively reinforcing expansion of production and income (that is, the multiplier).

     See also | foreign sector | domestic | foreign trade | import | net exports | balance of trade | free trade | trade barriers | quota | comparative advantage | competition |


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EXPORTS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2015. [Accessed: May 28, 2015].


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FACTOR DEMAND CURVE

A graphical representation of the relationship between the price to a factor of production and quantity of the factor demanded, holding all ceteris paribus factor demand determinants constant. The factor demand curve is one half of the factor market. The other half is the factor supply curve.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Real GDP
Fourth Quarter 2014
$17,418.3 Billion (Annual Rate) Source: BEA
Up 2.2% 2nd Estimate

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BROWN PRAGMATOX
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a going out of business sale seeking to buy either a 50 foot extension cord or a combination CD player, clock radio, and telephone (with answering machine). Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
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This isn't me! What am I?

A half gallon milk jug holds about $50 in pennies.
"A pint of sweat saves a gallon of blood. "

-- General George Patton

IGARCH
Integrated Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedasticity
A PEDestrian's Guide
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