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April 26, 2017 

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TOTAL COST AND MARGINAL COST: A mathematical connection between marginal cost and total cost stating that marginal cost IS the slope of the total cost curve. If the total cost curve has a positive slope (that is, is upward sloping), then marginal cost is positive. Moreover, if the total cost curve has a positive and increasingly steeper slope, then the marginal cost is positive and rising. If the total cost curve has a positive and decreasingly steeper slope, then the marginal cost is positive but falling.

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EXPORTS: The sale of goods to a foreign country. The United States, for example, sells a lot of the stuff produced within our boundaries to other countries, including wheat, beef, cars, furniture, and, well, almost every variety of product you care to name. In general, domestic producers (and their workers) are elated with the prospect of selling their goods to foreign countries--leading to more buyers, a higher price, and more profit. The higher price, however, is bad for domestic consumers. In that domestic consumers tend to have far less political clout than producers, very few criticisms of exports can be heard. On the positive side, though, exports do tend to add to the multiplicative, cumulatively reinforcing expansion of production and income (that is, the multiplier).

     See also | foreign sector | domestic | foreign trade | import | net exports | balance of trade | free trade | trade barriers | quota | comparative advantage | competition |


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EXPORTS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2017. [Accessed: April 26, 2017].


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST, PERFECT COMPETITION

Total factor cost per unit of factor input employed by a perfectly competitive firm in the production of output, found by dividing total factor cost by the quantity of factor input. Average factor cost, abbreviated AFC, is generally equal to the factor price. However, using the longer term average factor cost makes it easier to see the connection to related terms, including total factor cost and marginal factor cost.

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State of the ECONOMY

GDP: Real
Third Quarter 2016
$18,675.3 Billion (Annual Rate) Source: BEA
Up 5.0%

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PINK FADFLY
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a garage sale trying to buy either one of those memory foam pillows or a remote controlled train set. Be on the lookout for small children selling products door-to-door.
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On a typical day, the United States Mint produces over $1 million worth of dimes.
"Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes. It is best to admit them quickly and get on with improving your other innovations. "

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