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October 31, 2014 

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TRANSFERRABLE INPUT: An input that has a relatively large geographic market area due to the low cost of transportation. The low transportation cost means it is easier (that is, less expensive) to bring the input to the production activity rather than locating the production activity near the input. Like many things, transferrable inputs are a matter of degree. At the other end of the spectrum lies local inputs. Most manufactured intermediate goods tend to have a high degree of transferability. Information and energy inputs are also relatively easily transported.

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EXPORTS: The sale of goods to a foreign country. The United States, for example, sells a lot of the stuff produced within our boundaries to other countries, including wheat, beef, cars, furniture, and, well, almost every variety of product you care to name. In general, domestic producers (and their workers) are elated with the prospect of selling their goods to foreign countries--leading to more buyers, a higher price, and more profit. The higher price, however, is bad for domestic consumers. In that domestic consumers tend to have far less political clout than producers, very few criticisms of exports can be heard. On the positive side, though, exports do tend to add to the multiplicative, cumulatively reinforcing expansion of production and income (that is, the multiplier).

     See also | foreign sector | domestic | foreign trade | import | net exports | balance of trade | free trade | trade barriers | quota | comparative advantage | competition |


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EXPORTS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: October 31, 2014].


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AVERAGE TOTAL COST CURVE

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average total cost incurred by a firm in the short-run product of a good or service and the quantity produced. The average total cost curve is constructed to capture the relation between average total cost and the level of output, holding other variables, like technology and resource prices, constant. The average total cost curve is one of three average curves. The other two are average variable cost curve and average fixed cost curve. A related curve is the marginal cost curve.

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State of the ECONOMY

Wholesale Inventories
July 2014
$533.8 billion
Up 0.1% from June 2014. Econ. Stat. Admin.

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