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November 24, 2014 

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MEDIATION: Intervention by an impartial third party to settle disputes between two others. The actions of this third party--the mediator--are not legally binding. Mediators are frequently used in collective bargaining negotiations when unions and their employers have reached an impasse. Mediators help both sides work out a satisfactory agreement. But neither side is legally compelled to follow the mediator's advice.

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EXPORTS: The sale of goods to a foreign country. The United States, for example, sells a lot of the stuff produced within our boundaries to other countries, including wheat, beef, cars, furniture, and, well, almost every variety of product you care to name. In general, domestic producers (and their workers) are elated with the prospect of selling their goods to foreign countries--leading to more buyers, a higher price, and more profit. The higher price, however, is bad for domestic consumers. In that domestic consumers tend to have far less political clout than producers, very few criticisms of exports can be heard. On the positive side, though, exports do tend to add to the multiplicative, cumulatively reinforcing expansion of production and income (that is, the multiplier).

     See also | foreign sector | domestic | foreign trade | import | net exports | balance of trade | free trade | trade barriers | quota | comparative advantage | competition |


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EXPORTS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: November 24, 2014].


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RISK AVERSION

A preference for risk in which a person prefers guaranteed or certain income over risky income. Risk aversion arises due to decreasing marginal utility of income. A risk averse person prefers to avoid risk and is willing to pay to do so, often through the purchase of insurance. This is one of three risk preferences. The other two are risk neutrality and risk loving.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

U.S. National Debt
November 7, 2014
$17,927,481,147,910.94
$56,135.06 per person: U.S. Debt Clock

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WHITE GULLIBON
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall hoping to buy either a genuine fake plastic Tiffany lamp or a microwave over that won't burn your popcorn. Be on the lookout for fairy dust that tastes like salt.
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Lombard Street is London's equivalent of New York's Wall Street.
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