Google
Monday 
October 15, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
LOSS LEADER: Products sold below cost by a retail store in an attempt to attract buyers who are likely to buy other, more expensive, stuff. Stores are very fond of advertising and even selling popular products at very low prices. However, they hope that once customers have seen fit to enter their stores, then the suckers, er, customers will decide to buy other products that aren't so popular or so low priced. These popular, low-priced products are loss leaders. Sure the store loses profit on the products, but they make up these loses on other stuff.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

COMPETITION: In general, the actions of two or more rivals in pursuit of the same objective. In the context of markets, the specific objective is either selling goods to buyers or alternatively buying goods from sellers. Competition tends to come in two varieties -- competition among the few, which is market with a small number of sellers (or buyers), such that each seller (or buyer) has some degree of market control, and competition among the many, which is a market with so many buyers and sellers that none is able to influence the market price or quantity exchanged.

     See also | market | fourth rule of competition | efficiency | market control | market structure | perfect competition | monopoly | monopolistic competition | oligopoly | unfair competition | market share | antitrust laws |


Recommended Citation:

COMPETITION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: October 15, 2018].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: competition

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

STABILIZATION POLICIES

Economic policies undertaken by governments to counteract business-cycle fluctuations and prevent high rates of unemployment and inflation. The two most common stabilization policies are fiscal and monetary. Stabilization policies are also termed countercyclical policies, meaning that they attempt to "counter" the natural ups and downs of business "cycles." Expansionary policies are appropriate to reduce unemployment during a contraction and contractionary policies are aimed at reducing inflation during an expansion.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

ORANGE REBELOON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching the newspaper want ads trying to buy either a birthday greeting card for your uncle or a T-shirt commemorating the 2000 Presidential election. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

It's estimated that the U.S. economy has about $20 million of counterfeit currency in circulation, less than 0.001 perecent of the total legal currency.
"Give the American people a good cause, and there's nothing they can't lick. "

-- John Wayne, actor

EJ
Economic Journal
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2018 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster