October 21, 2016 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
Today's Index
Yesterday's Index

Help us compile the AmosWEB Free Lunch Index. Tell us about your last lunch.

Skipped lunch altogether.
Bought by another.
Ate lunch at home.
Brought lunch from home.
Fast food drive through.
Fast food dine in.
All-you-can eat buffet.
Casual dining with tip.
Fancy upscale with tip.

More About the Index
Best "change the topic" political answer?

New York.
Halloween mask construction.
Arc welding.
Road trip across country.
Uhm... Tuesday?

VERY LONG RUN: A period of time in which all inputs in the production process are variable and the technology and assorted social institutions affecting production can change. You should compare very long run with long run and production, short run and production, and market period.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number)Worth a Look Visit the WEB*pedia

IMPORTS: Goods and services produced by the foreign sector and purchased by the domestic economy. In other words, imports are goods purchased from other countries. The United States, for example, buys a lot of the stuff produced within the boundaries of other countries, including bananas, coffee, cars, chocolate, computers, and, well, a lot of other products. Imports, together with exports, are the essence of foreign trade--goods and services that are traded among the citizens of different nations. Imports and exports are frequently combined into a single term, net exports (exports minus imports).

     See also | foreign sector | domestic | foreign trade | export | net exports | balance of trade | free trade | trade barriers | quota | comparative advantage | competition | market control |

Recommended Citation:

IMPORTS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama,, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: October 21, 2016].

AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: imports

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama


Economic policies undertaken by governments to counteract business-cycle fluctuations and prevent high rates of unemployment and inflation. The two most common stabilization policies are fiscal and monetary. Stabilization policies are also termed countercyclical policies, meaning that they attempt to "counter" the natural ups and downs of business "cycles." Expansionary policies are appropriate to reduce unemployment during a contraction and contractionary policies are aimed at reducing inflation during an expansion.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


State of the ECONOMY

Median weekly earnings
Third Quarter 2015
$803 / week
Up from the 2nd quarter 2015

More Stats

[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites wanting to buy either a microwave over that won't burn your popcorn or a T-shirt commemorating the first day of winter. Be on the lookout for rusty deck screws.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Post WWI induced hyperinflation in German in the early 1900s raised prices by 726 million times from 1918 to 1923.
"A stumble may prevent a fall. "

-- Margaret Thatcher, British prime minister

last In Still Here
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback

| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2016 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster