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INDUCED CONSUMPTION: Household consumption expenditures that depend on income or production (especially disposable, national income, or gross national product). An increase in household disposable income triggers an increase in induced consumption expenditures. Induced consumption is graphically depicted as the slope of the consumption or propensity-to-consume line, and are measured by the marginal propensity to consume. The induced relation between income and consumption, as well as other induced expenditures, form the foundation of the multiplier effect triggered by changes in autonomous expenditures.

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PUBLIC GOODS: Goods that are difficult to keep nonpayers from consuming (excludability), and use of the goods by one person doesn't prevent use by others (rival consumption). Examples include national defense, a clean environment, and any fourth of July fireworks display. Public goods are invariably provided by government because there's no way a private business can profitably produce them. Private businesses can't sell public goods in markets, because they can't charge a price and keep nonpaying people away. Moreover, businesses shouldn't charge a price, because there's no opportunity cost for extra consumers. For efficiency, government needs to pay for public goods through taxes.

     See also | good types | excludability | rival consumption | efficiency | market | exchange | market failure | common-property good | near-public good | private good | free-rider problem |


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PUBLIC GOODS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: May 26, 2024].


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PSYCHOLOGICAL LAW

A principle of consumption behavior proposed by John Maynard Keynes stating that people have the propensity to spend a large fraction, but not all, of any additional income received. This psychological law is not so much a principle of psychology as an economic observation about consumption spending and is related to the notion of effective demand.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a crowded estate auction hoping to buy either a pair of designer sunglasses or looseleaf notebook paper. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
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The first paper notes printed in the United States were in denominations of 1 cent, 5 cents, 25 cents, and 50 cents.
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