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December 19, 2018 

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AGGREGATE MARKET EQUILIBRIUM: The state of equilibrium that exists in the aggregate market when real aggregate expenditures are equal to real production with no imbalances to induce changes in the price level or real production. In other words, the opposing forces of aggregate demand (the buyers) and aggregate supply (the sellers) exactly offset each other. The four macroeconomic sector (household, business, government, and foreign) buyers purchase all of the real production that they seek at the existing price level and business-sector producers sell all of the real production that they have at the existing price level. The aggregate market equilibrium actually comes in two forms: (1) long-run equilibrium, in which all three aggregated markets (product, financial, and resource) are in equilibrium and (2) short-run equilibrium, in which the product and financial markets are in equilibrium, but the resource markets are not.

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RIGHT TO WORK: A law preventing employers from making union membership a condition of employment. In other words, your boss can't forced you to join a union if you don't want to. There are two sides to this argument. On the one hand, workers should have the freedom to join a union or not based on the benefit to had from the union and perhaps their philosophical orientation towards unions. On the other hand, unions gain their strength by representing workers. Its negotiating position is hurt if it represents only a fraction of the workers. Moreover, any benefits a union gets for workers are enjoyed by its members (who pay dues) as well as nonmembers (who don't pay dues).

     See also | labor union | open shop | union shop | closed shop | collective bargaining | factor market | monopoly | yellow-dog contract |


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SELLERS' EXPECTATIONS, SUPPLY DETERMINANT

The expectations that sellers have concerning the future price of a good, which is assumed constant when a supply curve is constructed. If sellers expect a higher price, then supply decreases. If sellers expect a lower price, then supply increases. Sellers' expectations are one of five supply determinants that shift the supply curve when they change. The other four are resource prices, production technology, other prices, and number of sellers.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for the new strip mall out on the highway seeking to buy either storage boxes for your winter clothes or several magazines on time travel. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
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The 1909 Lincoln penny was the first U.S. coin with the likeness of a U.S. President.
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