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January 17, 2018 

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LOCAL INPUT: An input that has a relatively small geographic market area due to the high cost of transportation. The high transportation cost means it is easier (that is, less expensive) to locate the production activity near the input rather than trying to bring the input to the production activity. Like many things, local inputs are a matter of degree. At the other end of the spectrum lies transferrable inputs. Natural resources of the land, such as soil fertility, weather conditions, mineral deposits, tend to have the greatest local orientation. Labor and many urban public utilities, such as water distribution and sewage disposable, also tend to fall into the local category.

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SECOND-DEGREE PRICE DISCRIMINATION: A form of price discrimination in which a seller charges the different prices for different quantities of a good. This also goes by the name block pricing. This is possible because the different quantities are purchased by different types of buyers with different demand elasticities. This is one of three price discrimination degrees. The others are first-degree price discrimination and third-degree price discrimination.

     See also | price discrimination | market control | first-degree price discrimination | third-degree price discrimination | demand price | monopoly | price elasticity of demand |


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SECOND-DEGREE PRICE DISCRIMINATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: January 17, 2018].


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RENT SEEKING

The inclination of everyone who is alive and breathing to get as much extra income, wealth, profit, or satisfaction as they can. Rent, while technically considered the factor payment for the use of land resources, is also commonly used as a synonym for economic profit, for the acquisition of benefits above opportunity cost. Rent seeking is the entirely rational process of obtain as much "extra" as possible. In effect, rent seeking is nothing more than utility maximization. Efficiency problems can arise, however, when rent seeking is enhanced and enabled through market control, political influence, or actions of special interest groups.

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