March 21, 2018 

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DISEQUILIBRIUM, MARKET: A state of the market that exists when the opposing forces of demand and supply do not balance out and there is an inherent tendency for change. This should be directly (and immediately) contrasted with the entries on equilibrium and market equilibrium. For the market, disequilibrium is indicated by the existence of either a surplus or a shortage. The inherent tendency to change occurs because a surplus causes the price to decline and a shortage causes the price to rise. So long as market disequilibrium persists, the price will be induced to change.

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THIRD-DEGREE PRICE DISCRIMINATION: A form of price discrimination in which a seller charges different prices to groups that are differentiated by an easily identifiable characteristic, such as location, age, sex, or ethnic group. This is the most common type of price discrimination. This is one of three price discrimination degrees. The others are first-degree price discrimination and second-degree price discrimination.

     See also | price discrimination | market control | first-degree price discrimination | second-degree price discrimination | monopoly |

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A measure of concentration of the production in an industry calculated as the sum of the squares of market shares for each firm. This is one method of summarizing the degree to which an industry is oligopolistic and the concentration of market control held by the largest firms in the industry. Two other measures of industry concentration are the four-firm concentration ratio and the eight-firm concentration ratio.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time driving to a factory outlet hoping to buy either a large stuffed brown and white teddy bear or a replacement washer for your kitchen faucet. Be on the lookout for fairy dust that tastes like salt.
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Okun's Law posits that the unemployment rate increases by 1% for every 2% gap between real GDP and full-employment real GDP.
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