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February 8, 2023 

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ANTITRUST LAWS: A series of laws passed by the U. S. government that tries to maintain competition and prevent businesses from getting a monopoly or otherwise obtaining and exerting market control. The first of these, the Sherman Antitrust Act, was passed in 1890. Two others, the Clayton Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act, were enacted in 1914. These laws impose all sorts of restrictions on business ownership, control, mergers, pricing, and how businesses go about competing (or cooperating) with each other.

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SELF-CORRECTION, AGGREGATE MARKET: The automatic process through which the aggregate market adjusts from short-run equilibrium to long-run equilibrium. Self-correction results through shifts of the short-run aggregate supply curve caused by changes in wages and other resource prices. Short-run equilibrium in the aggregate market is characterized by inflexible or rigid resource prices, especially wages. This creates temporary imbalances in resource markets, especially unemployment and overemployment of labor. Self-correction is the process in which these temporary imbalances are eliminated through flexible prices and the aggregate market achieves long-run equilibrium. You might want to compare this process to self correction, market.

     See also | aggregate market | short-run aggregate market | long-run aggregate market | short-run aggregate supply curve | aggregate supply determinants | wage | resource prices | resource prices | inflationary gap | recessionary gap | self-correction, inflationary gap | self-correction, recessionary gap | self-correction, market | full employment | surplus | shortage |


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DEMAND PRICE

The maximum price that buyers are willing and able to pay for a given quantity of a good. While buyers might be willing and able to pay less than the demand price for a given quantity, they are not willing and able to pay more. The demand curve is a plot of the demand price for each quantity.

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