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July 31, 2015 

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BACKWARD-BENDING LABOR SUPPLY CURVE: A labor supply curve that is positively-sloped for relatively small quantities of labor and negatively-sloped for relatively large quantities of labor. In other words, workers supply larger quantities of labor in response to a higher wage when the wage is relatively low. However, when the wage reaches a relatively high level, further increases in the wage entice workers to reduce the quantity supplied. The supply curve thus bends back on itself. The reason for the negatively-sloped, backward-bending segment rests with the tradeoff between labor and leisure. Workers decide to "spend" a portion of their higher wage "buying" more leisure time, and thus working less. The end result is that the higher wage decreases the quantity of labor supplied.

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TWO-SECTOR KEYNESIAN MODEL: A model used to identify equilibrium in Keynesian economics based on aggregate expenditures by the two basic sectors (household and business). Equilibrium is achieved at the intersection of the aggregate expenditures line, AE = C + I, and the 45-degree line, Y = AE. This is the most basic Keynesian aggregate expenditures model that captures an induce expenditure (consumption) and an autonomous expenditure (investment).

     See also | Keynesian economics | Keynesian equilibrium | consumption line | aggregate expenditures line | 45-degree line | household sector | business sector | three-sector Keynesian model | four-sector Keynesian model |


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TWO-SECTOR KEYNESIAN MODEL, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2015. [Accessed: July 31, 2015].


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST, MONOPSONY

Total factor cost per unit of factor input employed by a monopsony in the production of output, found by dividing total factor cost by the quantity of factor input. Average factor cost, abbreviated AFC, is generally equal to the factor price. However, using the longer term average factor cost makes it easier to see the connection to related terms, including total factor cost and marginal factor cost.

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U 3 Unemployment
JUne 2015
5.3% Down slightly
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing about a thrift store wanting to buy either decorative picture frames or storage boxes for your income tax returns. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
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In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
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