Google
Sunday 
May 29, 2016 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
Today's Index
Yesterday's Index
137.5

Help us compile the AmosWEB Free Lunch Index. Tell us about your last lunch.

Skipped lunch altogether.
Bought by another.
Ate lunch at home.
Brought lunch from home.
Fast food drive through.
Fast food dine in.
All-you-can eat buffet.
Casual dining with tip.
Fancy upscale with tip.

More About the Index
The Federal Reserve Open Market Committee meets on?

Saturday and/or Sunday.
Monday.
Tuesday.
Wednesday.
Thursday.
Friday.

INCOME RECEIVED BUT NOT EARNED: Abbreviate IRBNE, this is income received by the household sector, but not earned by a factor of production. The three types of income received but not earned are Social Security payments, unemployment compensation payments, and welfare payments. These are also the three key transfer payments from the government sector to the household sector. The basic goal of transfer payments is to transfer a portion of the income earned by the factors of production (because they HAVE income) to other members of the household sector (who presumably NEED more income than they have). IRBNE is added to national income to derive personal income.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number)Worth a Look Visit the WEB*pedia

TWO-SECTOR KEYNESIAN MODEL: A model used to identify equilibrium in Keynesian economics based on aggregate expenditures by the two basic sectors (household and business). Equilibrium is achieved at the intersection of the aggregate expenditures line, AE = C + I, and the 45-degree line, Y = AE. This is the most basic Keynesian aggregate expenditures model that captures an induce expenditure (consumption) and an autonomous expenditure (investment).

     See also | Keynesian economics | Keynesian equilibrium | consumption line | aggregate expenditures line | 45-degree line | household sector | business sector | three-sector Keynesian model | four-sector Keynesian model |


Recommended Citation:

TWO-SECTOR KEYNESIAN MODEL, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: May 29, 2016].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: two-sector Keynesian model

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES

The total expenditures on gross domestic product undertaken in a given time period by the four sectors--household, business, government, and foreign. Expenditures made by each of these sectors are commonly termed consumption expenditures, investment expenditures, government purchases, and net exports. Aggregate expenditures (AE) are a cornerstone in the study of macroeconomics, playing critical roles in Keynesian economics, aggregate market analysis, and to a lesser degree, monetarism. In particular, aggregate expenditures are combined with the price level as aggregate demand.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Real average weekly earnings
November 2015
$365.85 Bureau of Labor Statistics
Constant 1982-84 dollars

More Stats

RED AGGRESSERINE
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store looking to buy either a birthday greeting card for your grandmother or a coffee cup commemorating yesterday. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, almost 2 million children were employed as factory workers.
"Never let the fear of striking out get in your way. "

-- Babe Ruth

DIDC
Depository Institutions Deregulation Committee
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2016 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster