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PPC: The abbreviation for production possibilities curve, which is a curve that illustrates the production possibilities for the economy. A production possibilities curve represents the boundary or frontier of the economy's production capabilities. That's why it's also frequently termed a production possibilities frontier (or PPF). As a frontier, it is the maximum production possible given existing (fixed) resources and technology. Producing on the curve means resources are fully employed, while producing inside the curve means resources are unemployed. The law of increasing opportunity cost is what gives the curve its distinctive convex shape.

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TWO-SECTOR KEYNESIAN MODEL: A model used to identify equilibrium in Keynesian economics based on aggregate expenditures by the two basic sectors (household and business). Equilibrium is achieved at the intersection of the aggregate expenditures line, AE = C + I, and the 45-degree line, Y = AE. This is the most basic Keynesian aggregate expenditures model that captures an induce expenditure (consumption) and an autonomous expenditure (investment).

     See also | Keynesian economics | Keynesian equilibrium | consumption line | aggregate expenditures line | 45-degree line | household sector | business sector | three-sector Keynesian model | four-sector Keynesian model |


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TWO-SECTOR KEYNESIAN MODEL, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: May 2, 2016].


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MARGINAL REVENUE, MONOPOLY

The change in total revenue resulting from a change in the quantity of output sold. Marginal revenue indicates how much extra revenue a monopoly receives for selling an extra unit of output. It is found by dividing the change in total revenue by the change in the quantity of output. Marginal revenue is the slope of the total revenue curve and is one of two revenue concepts derived from total revenue. The other is average revenue. To maximize profit, a monopoly equates marginal revenue and marginal cost.

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State of the ECONOMY

U.S. National Debt
December 26, 2015
$18,801,429,443,887.45
$58,381.23 per person: U.S. Debt Clock

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching the shopping channel trying to buy either a T-shirt commemorating last Friday (you know why) or a rotisserie oven that can also toast bread. Be on the lookout for florescent light bulbs that hum folk songs from the sixties.
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During the American Revolution, the price of corn rose 10,000 percent, the price of wheat 14,000 percent, the price of flour 15,000 percent, and the price of beef 33,000 percent.
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