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October 17, 2018 

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INCENTIVE: A cost or benefit that motivates a decision or action by consumers, businesses, or other participants in the economy. Some incentives are explicitly created by government policies to achieve a desired end or they can just be part of the wacky world we call economics. The most noted incentive in the study of economics is that provided by prices. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the . When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation system that society uses to answer the three questions of allocation.

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YIELD: The rate of return on a financial asset. In some simple cases, the yield on a financial asset, like commercial paper, corporate bond, or government security, is the asset's interest rate. However, as a more general rule, the yield includes both the interest earned from an asset plus any changes in the asset's price. Suppose, for example, that a $100,000 bond has a 10 percent interest rate, such that the holder receives $10,000 interest per year. If the price of the bond increases over the course of the year from $100,000 to $105,000, then the bond's yield is greater than 10 percent. It includes the $10,000 interest plus the $5,000 bump in the price, giving a yield of 15 percent. Because bonds and similar financial assets often have fixed interest payments, their prices and subsequently yields move up and down as economic conditions change.

     See also | rate of return | interest rate | asset | commercial paper | corporate bond | government security | price | financial markets |


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MACROECONOMIC SECTORS

The four aggregate sectors of the macroeconomy--household, business, government, and foreign--that reflect four key macroeconomic functions and are responsible for four expenditures on gross domestic product. These four sectors are the primary "actors" on the macroeconomic stage. Macroeconomic theories then explain macroeconomic phenomena by exploring the interaction among these four sectors.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling around a discount warehouse buying club hoping to buy either an AC adapter for your CD player or storage boxes for your family photos. Be on the lookout for the last item on a shelf.
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Approximately three-fourths of the U.S. paper currency in circular contains traces of cocaine.
"Do what you feel in your heart to be right for you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do and damned if you don't. "

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