Google
Wednesday 
August 23, 2017 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
UNEMPLOYMENT PROBLEMS: The unemployment or resources, especially labor, is one of the more important macroeconomic issues facing economists and government leaders. The two key problems are: personal hardships and lost production. When resources don't produce goods, their owners don't earn income. The loss of income results in less consumption and a lower living standard. If fewer resources are engaged in production, fewer goods and services are produced. A decline in the income, consumption, and production associated with unemployment triggers further declines in income, consumption, and production. Members of society who might escape the direct, immediate personal hardships of unemployment can succumb to the indirect, multiplicative problems of lost production.

Visit the GLOSS*arama


KEYNESIAN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE:

An aggregate supply curve--a graphical representation of the relation between real production and the price level--that reflects the basic principles of Keynesian economics. The Keynesian aggregate supply curve actually comes in two versions. The basic version is reverse-L shaped, with a horizontal segment connected to a vertical segment at a sharp corner. The modified version is also reverse-L shaped, but the vertical and horizontal segments have positive slopes and connecting corner is rounded. An alternative is the classical aggregate supply curve.
An aggregate supply curve is a graphical representation of the relation between real production and the price level. Keynesian economics implies that the aggregate supply curve contains two segments. One segment is more or less horizontal, indicating that price rigidity in the downward direction results in a reduction in real production. The other segment is more of less vertical, indicating that full employment is more or less maintained at higher price levels.

Keynesian AS Curve
Keynesian AS Curve

The exhibit to the right illustrates a basic Keynesian aggregate supply (AS) curve. The obvious characteristic is that the curve is shaped like a reserve L, with a horizontal segment joining a vertical segment at a sharp corner. The horizontal segment of the curve reflects the Keynesian notion that a decline in demand leads to a decline in real production, primarily because prices remain constant. The vertical segment is a recognition that the total quantities of resources are fixed and that total production is ultimately limited, which results in full employment.

While this reverse-L shaped curve captures the original essence of Keynesian economics, the Keynesian view has changed over the years. A more refined version of the Keynesian aggregate supply curve can be illustrated by clicking the [New Keynesian AS Curve] button.

This new curve retains the same basic reverse-L shape, but the horizontal segment has a slight, positive slope rather than being perfectly horizontal and the vertical segment has a steep, positive slope rather than being perfectly vertical. Moreover, the vertical and horizontal segments are joined by a curved segment rather than a sharp corner.

This version of the Keynesian aggregate supply curve is both more realistic and looks a great deal like the short-run aggregate supply curve used in modern aggregate market analysis.

KEYNESIAN CROSS =>


Recommended Citation:

KEYNESIAN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE, AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2017. [Accessed: August 23, 2017].


Check Out These Related Terms...

     | Keynesian economics | classical economics | classical aggregate supply curve | inflexible prices | effective demand | Keynesian model |


Or For A Little Background...

     | macroeconomics | full employment | short-run aggregate supply curve | aggregate supply | aggregate market analysis | natural unemployment | frictional unemployment | structural unemployment | price level | real gross domestic product |


And For Further Study...

     | aggregate market shocks | business cycles | aggregate demand increase, short-run aggregate market | aggregate demand decrease, short-run aggregate market | disequilibrium, short-run aggregate market | Keynesian equilibrium | injections-leakages model | fiscal policy | Keynesian disequilibrium | multiplier | paradox of thrift |


Search Again?

Back to the WEB*pedia


APLS

GREEN LOGIGUIN
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area seeking to buy either a rechargeable battery for your computer or shoe laces for your snow boots. Be on the lookout for the last item on a shelf.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Mark Twain said "I wonder how much it would take to buy soap buble if there was only one in the world."
"Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren't used to an environment where excellence is expected. "

-- Steve Jobs, Apple Computer co-founder

APR
Annual Percentage Rate
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2017 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster