Google
Wednesday 
May 22, 2019 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
DISCRETIONARY POLICY: Government policies that involve explicit actions designed to achieve specific goals. A common type of discretionary policy is that designed to stabilize business cycles, reduce unemployment, and lower inflation, through government spending and taxes (fiscal policy) or the money supply (monetary policy). Discretionary policies are also termed activist policies because they involve active decisions by government. A contrast to discretionary policy is automatic stabilizers that help stabilize business cycles without explicit government actions.

Visit the GLOSS*arama


PROPRIETORS' INCOME:

The official factor payment item in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economics Analysis measuring the combined payments for all four factors of production used in owner-operated business firms. Specifically, proprietors' income is the excess of revenue over explicit production cost of owner-operated businesses and includes payments for labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship. This is one of five official factor payments making up national income. The other four are compensation of employees, rental income of persons, net interest, and corporate profits. Proprietors' income is usually less than 10 percent of national income, typically in the 7 to 10 percent range.
While proprietorships are the namesake and most important contributor to proprietors' income, this item also includes partnerships. Because proprietors or partners of owner-operated businesses generally supply several factors of production--labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship--without explicit payment for each factor separately, the income received by the owners usually includes wage, interest, rent, and profit payments. However, because it is virtually impossible to identify what portion of the owners income is payment for each factor, they are lumped together as proprietors' income.

To see why proprietors' income warrants a special category in the National Income and Product Accounts, consider the operation of typical proprietor, Phil Gardener, a zucchini grower. Phil supplies the labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship used for zucchini production. He plants the zucchini seeds, pulls unwanted weeds, irrigates his crop, harvests the zucchinis when they are ripe, then sells his bounty to eager buyers. Along the way, Phil incurs explicit production cost for such inputs as seeds, water, paper sacks (for packaging), and gasoline (to drive to the market).

When Phil's zucchini crop is sold, he deducts the explicit costs of his assorted inputs, and what remains is his income, his "proprietor's income." However, Phil does not compensate himself separately for the services of his labor, capital, land, or entrepreneurship. As such, Phil's income actually includes wage, interest, rent, and profit factor payments. How much of each factor payment is included in his proprietor's income, no one knows.

The folks at the Bureau of Economic Analysis would like to include Phil's wages, interest, rent, and capital in the corresponding items in the National Income and Product Accounts separately--if they could. But they really cannot. They do not know how much of Phil's income is wages, interest, rent, and profit. So, they simply lump together his income with that of other proprietors and partners who operate like Phil into a separate category called proprietors' income.

Because a portion of proprietors' income is payment for the use of capital goods, it receives a capital consumption adjustment before being included as national income. The capital consumption adjustment is part of gross domestic product, but not part of national income. As such, any depreciation of the capital used by proprietors is deducted before calculating the proprietors' income.

<= PROPORTIONAL TAXPROPRIETORSHIP =>


Recommended Citation:

PROPRIETORS' INCOME, AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: May 22, 2019].


Check Out These Related Terms...

     | factor payments | compensation of employees | net interest | rental income of persons | corporate profits | gross domestic income | personal income | disposable income | net domestic product |


Or For A Little Background...

     | national income | gross domestic product | gross domestic product, income | production | resource markets | National Income and Product Accounts | Bureau of Economic Analysis | National Bureau of Economic Research |


And For Further Study...

     | personal income and national income | disposable income and personal income | gross domestic product, expenditures | gross domestic product, ins and outs | gross domestic product, welfare | gross national product | real gross domestic product | business cycles | circular flow | national income and gross domestic product | national income and net domestic product |


Related Websites (Will Open in New Window)...

     | Bureau of Economic Analysis |


Search Again?

Back to the WEB*pedia


APLS

RED AGGRESSERINE
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area wanting to buy either a set of luggage with wheels or a birthday gift for your aunt. Be on the lookout for the last item on a shelf.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

More money is spent on gardening than on any other hobby.
"Carpe diem! Rejoice while you are alive; enjoy the day; live life to the fullest; make the most of what you have. It is later than you think."

-- Horace, Ancient Roman poet

BVAR
Bayesian VAR (Vector Autoregression)
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2019 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster