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ECONOMIC AND MONETARY UNION: An aspect of the European Union designed to integrate economic and monetary policies and establish a single currency (the euro). The Economic and Monetary Union, abbreviated EMU, was created by the 1992 Maastricht Treaty and officially came into existence in 1999. The European Central Bank has control over monetary policy and the money supply for the Economic and Monetary Union.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Instability
  • What It Is
  • Fluctuations
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Extension
  • Instability
  • Self-Correction
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Basic Shifts
  • AD Shifts
  • AD Increase: Long Run
  • AD Decrease: Long Run
  • AD Increase: Short Run
  • AD Decrease: Short Run
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Complex Shifts
  • AD
  • AD Increase
  • AD Decrease
  • SRAS
  • SRAS Increase
  • SRAS Decrease
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Synthesis
  • Business Cycles
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home
    Aggregate Shocks

    In this lesson we use the aggregate market model to analyze assorted disruptions that cause shifts of the aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, and long-run aggregate supply curves. The reason for doing this, of course, is to explain and understand macroeconomic activity, especially business cycle instability that causes inflation and unemployment.

    • The first unit of this lesson reviews the aggregate market and examines how it is affected macroeconomic instability.
    • In the second unit, we take and look at assorted demands on both the demand side and supply side of the aggregate market that cause shorts to the aggregate market.
    • We then move into an analysis of six basic shifts involving increases and decreases in the aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, and long-run aggregate supply curves.
    • The fourth unit builds on these six basic shifts to examine four complex shifts in which recessionary and inflationary gaps trigger self-correction adjustments of the short-run aggregate supply.
    • We close out this lesson in the fifth with a thought or two on how the aggregate market can be used to explain business cycle fluctuations.

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    PRODUCTION STAGES

    The three stages of production are characterized by the slopes, shapes, and interrelationships of the total, marginal, and average product curves. The first stage is characterized by a positive slope of the average product curve, ending at the intersection between the average product and marginal product curves; the second stage by continues up to the point in which the marginal product becomes negative, at the peak of the total product curve; and the third stage exists over the range of in which the total product curve is negatively sloped. In Stage I, average product is positive and increasing. In Stage II, marginal product is positive, but decreasing. And in Stage III, total product is decreasing.

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    APLS

    BROWN PRAGMATOX
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a dollar discount store hoping to buy either a T-shirt commemorating the 2000 Olympics or a genuine fake plastic Tiffany lamp. Be on the lookout for malfunctioning pocket calculators.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    In the early 1900s around 300 automobile companies operated in the United States.
    "The majority of men meet with failure because of their lack of persistence in creating new plans to take the place of those that fail. "

    -- Napoleon Hill, author

    MPS
    Marginal Propensity to Save
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
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